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Optimized testing strategy for the diagnosis of GAA-FGF14 ataxia/spinocerebellar ataxia 27B

Bonnet, C; Pellerin, D; Roth, V; Clément, G; Wandzel, M; Lambert, L; Frismand, S; ... Renaud, M; + view all (2023) Optimized testing strategy for the diagnosis of GAA-FGF14 ataxia/spinocerebellar ataxia 27B. Scientific Reports , 13 (1) , Article 9737. 10.1038/s41598-023-36654-8. (In press). Green open access

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Abstract

Dominantly inherited GAA repeat expansions in FGF14 are a common cause of spinocerebellar ataxia (GAA-FGF14 ataxia; spinocerebellar ataxia 27B). Molecular confirmation of FGF14 GAA repeat expansions has thus far mostly relied on long-read sequencing, a technology that is not yet widely available in clinical laboratories. We developed and validated a strategy to detect FGF14 GAA repeat expansions using long-range PCR, bidirectional repeat-primed PCRs, and Sanger sequencing. We compared this strategy to targeted nanopore sequencing in a cohort of 22 French Canadian patients and next validated it in a cohort of 53 French index patients with unsolved ataxia. Method comparison showed that capillary electrophoresis of long-range PCR amplification products significantly underestimated expansion sizes compared to nanopore sequencing (slope, 0.87 [95% CI, 0.81 to 0.93]; intercept, 14.58 [95% CI, − 2.48 to 31.12]) and gel electrophoresis (slope, 0.84 [95% CI, 0.78 to 0.97]; intercept, 21.34 [95% CI, − 27.66 to 40.22]). The latter techniques yielded similar size estimates. Following calibration with internal controls, expansion size estimates were similar between capillary electrophoresis and nanopore sequencing (slope: 0.98 [95% CI, 0.92 to 1.04]; intercept: 10.62 [95% CI, − 7.49 to 27.71]), and gel electrophoresis (slope: 0.94 [95% CI, 0.88 to 1.09]; intercept: 18.81 [95% CI, − 41.93 to 39.15]). Diagnosis was accurately confirmed for all 22 French Canadian patients using this strategy. We also identified 9 French patients (9/53; 17%) and 2 of their relatives who carried an FGF14 (GAA)≥250 expansion. This novel strategy reliably detected and sized FGF14 GAA expansions, and compared favorably to long-read sequencing.

Type: Article
Title: Optimized testing strategy for the diagnosis of GAA-FGF14 ataxia/spinocerebellar ataxia 27B
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1038/s41598-023-36654-8
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-023-36654-8
Language: English
Additional information: Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
Keywords: Humans, Canada, Friedreich Ataxia, Spinocerebellar Ataxias, Trinucleotide Repeat Expansion
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Department of Neuromuscular Diseases
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10172818
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