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A Retrospective Study of Non-Communicable Diseases amongst Blue-Collar Migrant Workers in Qatar

Al-Hatimy, Fatima; Farooq, Abdulaziz; Al Abiad, Mohamad; Yerramsetti, Shilpi; Al-Nesf, Maryam Ali; Manickam, Chidambaram; Al-Thani, Mohammed H; ... Al-Maadheed, Mohammed; + view all (2022) A Retrospective Study of Non-Communicable Diseases amongst Blue-Collar Migrant Workers in Qatar. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health , 19 (4) , Article 2266. 10.3390/ijerph19042266. Green open access

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: South Asian workers have a greater predisposition to non-communicable diseases (NCDs) that is exacerbated by migration and length of residence in host countries. Aims: To examine the association between length of residence in Qatar with diagnosis of NCDs in male blue-collar workers. METHODS: A retrospective investigation of the electronic health records (EHRs) of 119,581 clinical visits by 58,342 patients was conducted. Data included age, nationality and confirmed ICD-10 diagnosis. Based on duration of residence, the population was divided into groups: ≤6 months, 6–12 months, 1–≤2 years, 2–≤5 years, 5–≤6 years, >6 years. It was assumed that the group that had been resident in Qatar for ≤6 months represented diseases that had been acquired in their countries of origin. Results: South Asian (90%) patients presented with NCDs at a younger (mean ± SD age of 34.8 ± 9.0 years) age. Diabetes and hypertension were higher in those who had just arrived (<6 months’ group), compared to the other durations of residence groups. Conversely, acute respiratory infections, as well as dermatitis and eczema, all increased, perhaps a consequence of shared living/working facilities. Only patients with diabetes and hypertension visited the clinic multiple times, and the cost of medication for these NCDs was affordable, relative to earnings. DISCUSSION/CONCLUSIONS: Blue-collar workers were predominantly South Asian, from lower socioeconomic classes, with early onset chronic NCDs. Notably, residence in Qatar gave them better access to affordable, significantly subsidized healthcare, leading to effective management of these chronic conditions.

Type: Article
Title: A Retrospective Study of Non-Communicable Diseases amongst Blue-Collar Migrant Workers in Qatar
Location: Switzerland
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.3390/ijerph19042266
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19042266
Language: English
Additional information: © 2022 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
Keywords: Non-communicable diseases; diabetes; hypertension; dyslipidaemia; blue-collar workers; low-income community
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > VP: Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > VP: Health > SLMS Research Coordination
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10172376
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