UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Autosomal Dominant STAT6 Gain of Function Causes Severe Atopy Associated with Lymphoma

Minskaia, Ekaterina; Maimaris, Jesmeen; Jenkins, Persephone; Albuquerque, Adriana S; Hong, Ying; Eleftheriou, Despina; Gilmour, Kimberly C; ... Burns, Siobhan O; + view all (2023) Autosomal Dominant STAT6 Gain of Function Causes Severe Atopy Associated with Lymphoma. Journal of Clinical Immunology 10.1007/s10875-023-01530-7. (In press). Green open access

[thumbnail of s10875-023-01530-7.pdf]
Preview
Text
s10875-023-01530-7.pdf - Published Version

Download (6MB) | Preview

Abstract

The transcription factor STAT6 (Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 6) is a key regulator of Th2 (T-helper 2) mediated allergic inflammation via the IL-4 (interleukin-4) JAK (Janus kinase)/STAT signalling pathway. We identified a novel heterozygous germline mutation STAT6 c.1255G > C, p.D419H leading to overactivity of IL-4 JAK/STAT signalling pathway, in a kindred affected by early-onset atopic dermatitis, food allergy, eosinophilic asthma, anaphylaxis and follicular lymphoma. STAT6 D419H expression and functional activity were compared with wild type STAT6 in transduced HEK293T cells and to healthy control primary skin fibroblasts and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). We observed consistently higher STAT6 levels at baseline and higher STAT6 and phosphorylated STAT6 following IL-4 stimulation in D419H cell lines and primary cells compared to wild type controls. The pSTAT6/STAT6 ratios were unchanged between D419H and control cells suggesting that elevated pSTAT6 levels resulted from higher total basal STAT6 expression. The selective JAK1/JAK2 inhibitor ruxolitinib reduced pSTAT6 levels in D419H HEK293T cells and patient PBMC. Nuclear staining demonstrated increased STAT6 in patient fibroblasts at baseline and both STAT6 and pSTAT6 after IL-4 stimulation. We also observed higher transcriptional upregulation of downstream genes (XBP1 and EPAS1) in patient PBMC. Our study confirms STAT6 gain of function (GOF) as a novel monogenetic cause of early onset atopic disease. The clinical association of lymphoma in our kindred, along with previous data linking somatic STAT6 D419H mutations to follicular lymphoma suggest that patients with STAT6 GOF disease may be at higher risk of lymphomagenesis.245 words.

Type: Article
Title: Autosomal Dominant STAT6 Gain of Function Causes Severe Atopy Associated with Lymphoma
Location: Netherlands
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1007/s10875-023-01530-7
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10875-023-01530-7
Language: English
Additional information: This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
Keywords: Atopy, Gain-of-function, Lymphoma, STAT6
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Infection and Immunity
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > Infection, Immunity and Inflammation Dept
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10172196
Downloads since deposit
22Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item