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Antenatal interventions to reduce risk of low birth weight related to maternal infections during pregnancy

Muthiani, Yvonne; Hunter, Patricia J; Näsänen-Gilmore, Pieta K; Koivu, Annariina M; Isojärvi, Jaana; Luoma, Juho; Salenius, Meeri; ... Ashorn, Per; + view all (2023) Antenatal interventions to reduce risk of low birth weight related to maternal infections during pregnancy. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition , 117 (Suppl.2) S118-S133. 10.1016/j.ajcnut.2023.02.025.

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Maternal infections during pregnancy have been linked to increased risk of adverse birth outcomes, including low birth weight (LBW), preterm birth (PTB), small for gestational age (SGA), and stillbirth (SB). OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this article was to summarize evidence from published literature on the effect of key interventions targeting maternal infections on adverse birth outcomes. METHODS: We searched MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and CINAHL Complete between March 2020 and May 2020 with an update to cover until August 2022. We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and reviews of RCTs of 15 antenatal interventions for pregnant women reporting LBW, PTB, SGA, or SB as outcomes. RESULTS: Of the 15 reviewed interventions, the administration of 3 or more doses of intermittent preventive treatment in pregnancy with sulphadoxine–pyrimethamine [IPTp-SP; RR: 0.80 (95% CI: 0.69, 0.94)] can reduce risk of LBW compared with 2 doses. The provision of insecticide-treated bed nets, periodontal treatment, and screening and treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria may reduce risk of LBW. Maternal viral influenza vaccination, treatment of bacterial vaginosis, intermittent preventive treatment with dihydroartemisinin–piperaquine compared with IPTp-SP, and intermittent screening and treatment of malaria during pregnancy compared with IPTp were deemed unlikely to reduce the prevalence of adverse birth outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: At present, there is limited evidence from RCTs available for some potentially relevant interventions targeting maternal infections, which could be prioritized for future research.

Type: Article
Title: Antenatal interventions to reduce risk of low birth weight related to maternal infections during pregnancy
DOI: 10.1016/j.ajcnut.2023.02.025
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajcnut.2023.02.025
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: Low birth weight, preterm birth, small for gestational age, stillbirth, antenatal care, pregnancy, maternal infections, low- and middle-income countries
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > Infection, Immunity and Inflammation Dept
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10172142
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