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Prevalence of co-existent neoplasia in clinically diagnosed pterygia in a UK population

Quhill, H; Magan, T; Thaung, C; Sagoo, MS; (2023) Prevalence of co-existent neoplasia in clinically diagnosed pterygia in a UK population. Eye 10.1038/s41433-023-02594-w. Green open access

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Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Ocular surface squamous neoplasia (OSSN) and pterygia share risk factors and co-exist in only a minority of cases. Reported rates of OSSN in specimens sent as pterygium for histopathological analysis vary between 0% and nearly 10%, with the highest rates reported in countries with high levels of ultraviolet light exposure. As there is a paucity of data in European populations, the aim of this study was to report the prevalence of co-existent OSSN or other neoplastic disease in clinically suspected pterygium specimens sent to a specialist ophthalmic pathology service in London, United Kingdom. METHODS: We performed a retrospective review of sequential histopathology records of patients with excised tissue submitted as suspected “pterygium” between 1997 and 2021. RESULTS: In total, 2061 specimens of pterygia were received during the 24-year period, with a prevalence of neoplasia in those specimens of 0.6% (n = 12). On detailed review of the medical records of these patients, half (n = 6) had the pre-operative clinical suspicion of possible OSSN. Of those cases without clinical suspicion pre-operatively, one was diagnosed with invasive squamous cell carcinoma of the conjunctiva. CONCLUSION: In this study, rates of unexpected diagnoses are reassuringly low. These results may challenge accepted dogma, and influence future guidance for the indications for submitting non-suspicious pterygia for histopathological analysis.

Type: Article
Title: Prevalence of co-existent neoplasia in clinically diagnosed pterygia in a UK population
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1038/s41433-023-02594-w
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41433-023-02594-w
Language: English
Additional information: This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Institute of Ophthalmology
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10171421
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