UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

National Cancer Diagnosis Audits for England 2018 versus 2014: a comparative analysis

Swann, Ruth; McPhail, Sean; Abel, Gary A; Witt, Jana; Wills, Lorna; Hiom, Sara; Lyratzopoulos, Georgios; (2023) National Cancer Diagnosis Audits for England 2018 versus 2014: a comparative analysis. British Journal of General Practice , Article BJGP.2022.0268. 10.3399/BJGP.2022.0268. (In press). Green open access

[thumbnail of Lyratzopoulos_National Cancer Diagnosis Audits for England 2018 versus 2014_VoR.pdf]
Preview
Text
Lyratzopoulos_National Cancer Diagnosis Audits for England 2018 versus 2014_VoR.pdf - Published Version

Download (157kB) | Preview

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Timely diagnosis of cancer in patients who present with symptoms in primary care is a quality-improvement priority. AIM: To examine possible changes to aspects of the diagnostic process, and its timeliness, before and after publication of the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence's (2015) guidance on the referral of suspected cancer in primary care. DESIGN AND SETTING: Comparison of findings from population-based clinical audits of cancer diagnosis in general practices in England for patients diagnosed in 2018 or 2014. METHOD: GPs in 1878 (2018) and 439 (2014) practices collected primary care information on the diagnostic pathway of cancer patients. Key measures including patient characteristics, place of presentation, number of pre-referral consultations, use of primary care investigations, and referral type were compared between the two audits by descriptive analysis and regression models. RESULTS: Among 64 489 (2018) and 17 042 (2014) records of a new cancer diagnosis, the percentage of patients with same-day referral (denoted by a primary care interval of 0 days) was higher in 2018 (42.7% versus 37.7%) than in 2014, with similar improvements in median diagnostic interval (36 days versus 40 days). Compared with 2014, in 2018: fewer patients had ≥3 pre-referral consultations (18.8% versus 26.2%); use of primary care investigations increased (47.9% versus 45.4%); urgent cancer referrals increased (54.8% versus 51.8%); emergency referrals decreased (13.4% versus 16.5%); and recorded use of safety netting decreased (40.0% versus 44.4%). CONCLUSION: In the 5-year period, including the year when national guidelines were updated (that is, 2015), there were substantial improvements to the diagnostic process of patients who present to general practice in England with symptoms of a subsequently diagnosed cancer.

Type: Article
Title: National Cancer Diagnosis Audits for England 2018 versus 2014: a comparative analysis
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.3399/BJGP.2022.0268
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.3399/BJGP.2022.0268
Language: English
Additional information: ©The Authors This is the full-length article (published online 31 May 2023) of an abridged version published in print. Cite this version as: Br J Gen Pract 2023; DOI: https://doi.org/10.3399/BJGP.2022.0268
Keywords: cancer, clinical audit, diagnosis, investigations, morbidity, primary care
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Behavioural Science and Health
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10171380
Downloads since deposit
11Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item