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The role of accelerator programmes in supporting the adoption of digital health technologies: A qualitative study of the perspectives of small- and medium-sized enterprises

Njoku, Chidi; Green Hofer, Stuart; Sathyamoorthy, Ganesh; Patel, Neelam; Potts, Henry WW; (2023) The role of accelerator programmes in supporting the adoption of digital health technologies: A qualitative study of the perspectives of small- and medium-sized enterprises. Digital Health , 9 pp. 1-10. 10.1177/20552076231173303. Green open access

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Abstract

Objective Evidence-based digital health technologies are increasingly important in delivering care to an ageing population with constrained resources. In the United Kingdom, accelerator programmes (APs) have been developed to support the adoption of digital health technologies within the National Health Service. This study aims to explore the perspectives of stakeholders using APs. Methods Stakeholders representing nine small -and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) that were engaged with three different APs ( n = 9). Semi-structured interviews were conducted with key informants between April and September 2018. Framework analysis of the data was performed to explore their perspectives on APs. Results Four key themes were generated. Informants reported the need to generate evidence before and during the programme, appreciating different types of evidence and their importance. Informants identified several key factors that were a catalyst for success, including involvement in the programme and access to individuals and organisations that were crucial for support. However, several barriers were identified at the programme and system levels. Finally, informants identified key supporting processes that enhanced the adoption of their innovations. Conclusion SMEs that develop digital health technologies report that, while APs are useful in supporting the adoption of these technologies, some issues remain. These relate to the emphasis on traditional research evidence that remains a challenge for SMEs to generate. Also, several system-level barriers to innovation in healthcare persist. As APs and SMEs continue to create an entrepreneurial ecosystem, there is increased potential for the development of supporting processes and infrastructure to accelerate the efficient and timely adoption of new digital health technologies.

Type: Article
Title: The role of accelerator programmes in supporting the adoption of digital health technologies: A qualitative study of the perspectives of small- and medium-sized enterprises
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1177/20552076231173303
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1177/20552076231173303
Language: English
Additional information: This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution- NonCommercial-NoDerivs 4.0 License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/) which permits non-commercial use, reproduction and distribution of the work as published without adaptation or alteration, without further permission provided the original work is attributed as specified on the SAGE and Open Access page (https://us.sagepub.com/en-us/nam/open-access-at-sage).
Keywords: Technological innovations, Technology assessment, Innovation diffusion, Digital health, Evidence-based healthcare
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Health Informatics
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Health Informatics > CHIME
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10170963
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