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Dysregulated responses to stress and weight in people with type 2 diabetes

Hackett, Ruth A; Gareddu, Alessia; Panagi, Laura; Steptoe, Andrew; Poole, Lydia; (2023) Dysregulated responses to stress and weight in people with type 2 diabetes. Journal of Psychosomatic Research , 170 , Article 111354. 10.1016/j.jpsychores.2023.111354. Green open access

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Dysregulated stress responsivity has been linked with weight gain in healthy samples. However, the relationship between disturbances in stress-related biology and changes in weight in people with type 2 diabetes (T2D) is unclear. METHOD: A total of 66 participants with T2D underwent laboratory stress-testing in 2011-2012. Cardiovascular, neuroendocrine and inflammatory responses to standardised mental stress were assessed, and Body Mass Index (BMI) was measured. Participants self-reported information on BMI in 2019. Associations between stress-related biological responses and BMI at follow-up were modelled using linear regression adjusting for age, sex, resting biological levels and baseline BMI. RESULTS: Blunted diastolic blood pressure reactivity (B = -0.092, 95% CI -0.177; -0.007, p = 0.034) as well as poorer systolic blood pressure (B = -0.050, 95% CI -0.084; - 0.017, p = 0.004), diastolic blood pressure (B = -0.068, 95% CI -0.132; -0.004, p = 0.034) and heart rate (B = -0.122, 95% CI -0.015;-0.230, p = 0.027) recovery post-stress were associated with higher BMI 7.5 years later. Greater interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (B = 16.93, 95% CI 6.20; 27.67, p = 0.003) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 reactivity (B = 0.04, 95% CI 0.002; 0.084, p = 0.041) were associated with weight gain. No significant associations were detected for interleukin-6 or laboratory cortisol measures. CONCLUSION: Disturbances in stress-related biology may promote weight gain in people with T2D. Research with a larger sample size is required to explore associations between stress responsivity and BMI in people with T2D.

Type: Article
Title: Dysregulated responses to stress and weight in people with type 2 diabetes
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1016/j.jpsychores.2023.111354
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpsychores.2023.111354
Language: English
Additional information: © 2023 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. under a Creative Commons license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
Keywords: Laboratory stress testing, Obesity, Type 2 diabetes
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Behavioural Science and Health
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10170797
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