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Love Shouldn't Hurt - E le Sauā le Alofa: Co-designing a theory of change for preventing violence against women in Samoa

Mannell, Jenevieve; Tevaga, Pepe; Heinrich, Sina; Fruean, Sam; Chang, Siliniu Lina; Lowe, Hattie; Brown, Laura J; ... Suaalii-Sauni, Tamasailau; + view all (2023) Love Shouldn't Hurt - E le Sauā le Alofa: Co-designing a theory of change for preventing violence against women in Samoa. Glob Public Health , 18 (1) , Article 2201632. 10.1080/17441692.2023.2201632. Green open access

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Abstract

Despite the widespread adoption of Theories of Change (ToC) for programme evaluation, the process of collaboratively developing these theories is rarely outlined or critical analysed, limiting broader methodological discussions on co-production. We developed a ToC as part of E le Sauā le Alofa ('Love Shouldn't Hurt') - a participatory peer-research study to prevent violence against women (VAW) in Samoa. The ToC was developed in four phases: (1) semi-structured interviews with village representatives (n = 20); (2) peer-led semi-structured interviews with community members (n = 60), (3) community conversations with 10 villages (n = 217) to discuss causal mechanisms for preventing VAW, and (4) finalising the ToC pathways. Several challenges were identified, including conflicting understandings of VAW as a problem; the linearity of the ToC framework in contrast to intersecting realities of people's lived experiences; the importance of emotional engagements, and theory development as a contradictory and incomplete process. The process also raised opportunities including a deeper exploration of local meaning-making, iterative engagement with local mechanisms of violence prevention, and clear evidence of ownership by communities in developing a uniquely Samoan intervention to prevent VAW. This study highlights a clear need for ToCs to be complemented by indigenous frameworks and methodologies in post-colonial settings such as Samoa.

Type: Article
Title: Love Shouldn't Hurt - E le Sauā le Alofa: Co-designing a theory of change for preventing violence against women in Samoa
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1080/17441692.2023.2201632
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1080/17441692.2023.2201632
Language: English
Additional information: © 2023 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. The terms on which this article has been published allow the posting of the Accepted Manuscript in a repository by the author(s) or with their consent.
Keywords: Samoa, Violence against women, theory of change, theory-driven approaches to intervention development, Humans, Female, Love, Violence, Samoa, Program Evaluation, Peer Group
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute for Global Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute for Global Health > Infection and Population Health
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10168606
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