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Predicting severe pain after major surgery: a secondary analysis of the Peri-operative Quality Improvement Programme (PQIP) dataset

Armstrong, RA; Fayaz, A; Manning, GLP; Moonesinghe, SR; Oliver, CM; Moonesinghe, SR; Wagstaff, D; ... Brett, S; + view all (2023) Predicting severe pain after major surgery: a secondary analysis of the Peri-operative Quality Improvement Programme (PQIP) dataset. Anaesthesia 10.1111/anae.15984. (In press). Green open access

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Abstract

Acute postoperative pain is common, distressing and associated with increased morbidity. Targeted interventions can prevent its development. We aimed to develop and internally validate a predictive tool to pre-emptively identify patients at risk of severe pain following major surgery. We analysed data from the UK Peri-operative Quality Improvement Programme to develop and validate a logistic regression model to predict severe pain on the first postoperative day using pre-operative variables. Secondary analyses included the use of peri-operative variables. Data from 17,079 patients undergoing major surgery were included. Severe pain was reported by 3140 (18.4%) patients; this was more prevalent in females, patients with cancer or insulin-dependent diabetes, current smokers and in those taking baseline opioids. Our final model included 25 pre-operative predictors with an optimism-corrected c-statistic of 0.66 and good calibration (mean absolute error 0.005, p = 0.35). Decision-curve analysis suggested an optimal cut-off value of 20–30% predicted risk to identify high-risk individuals. Potentially modifiable risk factors included smoking status and patient-reported measures of psychological well-being. Non-modifiable factors included demographic and surgical factors. Discrimination was improved by the addition of intra-operative variables (likelihood ratio χ2 496.5, p < 0.001) but not by the addition of baseline opioid data. On internal validation, our pre-operative prediction model was well calibrated but discrimination was moderate. Performance was improved with the inclusion of peri-operative covariates suggesting pre-operative variables alone are not sufficient to adequately predict postoperative pain.

Type: Article
Title: Predicting severe pain after major surgery: a secondary analysis of the Peri-operative Quality Improvement Programme (PQIP) dataset
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1111/anae.15984
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1111/anae.15984
Language: English
Additional information: This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third-party material in this article are included in the Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Keywords: Major surgery, observational study, postoperative pain, risk factors
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci > Department of Targeted Intervention
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10167145
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