UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Amygdala connectivity related to subsequent stress responses during the COVID-19 outbreak

Zhou, Yuan; He, Yuwen; Jin, Yuening; Zeidman, Peter; Gao, Lianlu; Rong, Bei; Huang, Huan; ... Wang, Huiling; + view all (2023) Amygdala connectivity related to subsequent stress responses during the COVID-19 outbreak. Frontiers in Psychiatry , 14 , Article 999934. 10.3389/fpsyt.2023.999934. Green open access

[thumbnail of fpsyt-14-999934.pdf]
Preview
Text
fpsyt-14-999934.pdf - Published Version

Download (2MB) | Preview

Abstract

Introduction: The amygdala plays an important role in stress responses and stress-related psychiatric disorders. It is possible that amygdala connectivity may be a neurobiological vulnerability marker for stress responses or stress-related psychiatric disorders and will be useful to precisely identify the vulnerable individuals before stress happens. However, little is known about the relationship between amygdala connectivity and subsequent stress responses. The current study investigated whether amygdala connectivity measured before experiencing stress is a predisposing neural feature of subsequent stress responses while individuals face an emergent and unexpected event like the COVID-19 outbreak. Methods: Data collected before the COVID-19 pandemic from an established fMRI cohort who lived in the pandemic center in China (Hubei) during the COVID-19 outbreak were used to investigate the relationship between amygdala connectivity and stress responses during and after the pandemic in 2020. The amygdala connectivity was measured with resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) and effective connectivity. Results: We found the rsFC of the right amygdala with the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC) was negatively correlated with the stress responses at the first survey during the COVID-19 outbreak, and the rsFC between the right amygdala and bilateral superior frontal gyri (partially overlapped with the dmPFC) was correlated with SBSC at the second survey. Dynamic causal modeling suggested that the self-connection of the right amygdala was negatively correlated with stress responses during the pandemic. Discussion: Our findings expand our understanding about the role of amygdala in stress responses and stress-related psychiatric disorders and suggest that amygdala connectivity is a predisposing neural feature of subsequent stress responses.

Type: Article
Title: Amygdala connectivity related to subsequent stress responses during the COVID-19 outbreak
Location: Switzerland
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.3389/fpsyt.2023.999934
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyt.2023.999934
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © 2023 Zhou, He, Jin, Zeidman, Gao, Rong, Huang, Feng, Cui, Zhang, Wang, Wang, Xiang and Wang. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.
Keywords: COVID-19, amygdala, dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, effective connectivity, resting-state functional connectivity, stress
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Imaging Neuroscience
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10166866
Downloads since deposit
16Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item