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The effects of computerised cognitive training on post-CABG delirium and cognitive change: A prospective randomised controlled trial

Greaves, Danielle; Astley, Jack; Psaltis, Peter J; Lampit, Amit; Davis, Daniel HJ; Ghezzi, Erica S; Smith, Ashleigh E; ... Keage, Hannah AD; + view all (2023) The effects of computerised cognitive training on post-CABG delirium and cognitive change: A prospective randomised controlled trial. Delirium 10.56392/001c.67976. (In press). Green open access

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Abstract

Background: Cognitive impairments, including delirium, are common after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Improving cognition pre- and post-operatively using computerised cognitive training (CCT) may be an effective approach to improve cognitive outcomes in CABG patients. Objectives: Investigate the effect of remotely supervised CCT on cognitive outcomes, including delirium, in older adults undergoing CABG surgery. Methods: Thirty-six participants, were analysed in a single-blinded randomised controlled trial (CCT Intervention: n = 18, Control: n = 18). CCT was completed by the intervention group pre-operatively (every other day, 45–60-minute sessions until surgery) and post-operatively, beginning 1-month post-CABG (3 x 45–60-minute sessions/week for 12-weeks), while the control group maintained usual care plus weekly phone calls. Cognitive assessments were conducted pre- and post-operatively at multiple follow-ups (discharge, 4-months and 6-months). Post-operative delirium incidence was assessed daily until discharge. Cognitive change data were calculated at each follow-up for each cognitive test (Addenbrooke’s Cognitive Examination III and CANTAB; z-scored). Results: Adherence to the CCT intervention (completion of three pre-operative or 66% of post-operative sessions) was achieved in 68% of pre-CABG and 59% of post-CABG participants. There were no statistically significant effects of CCT on any cognitive outcome, including delirium incidence. Conclusion: Adherence to the CCT program was comparatively higher than previous feasibility studies, possibly due to the level of supervision and support provided (blend of face-to-face and home-based training, with support phone calls). Implementing CCT interventions both pre- and post-operatively is feasible in those undergoing CABG. No statistically significant benefits from the CCT interventions were identified for delirium or cognitive function post-CABG, likely due to the sample size available (study recruitment greatly impacted by COVID-19). It also may be the case that multimodal intervention would be more effective.

Type: Article
Title: The effects of computerised cognitive training on post-CABG delirium and cognitive change: A prospective randomised controlled trial
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.56392/001c.67976
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.56392/001c.67976
Language: English
Additional information: This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (CCBY-4.0). View this license’s legal deed at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0 and legal code at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/legalcode for more information.
Keywords: cognitive training, delirium, Coronary artery bypass grafting, cognition, post-operative
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science > Population Science and Experimental Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science > Population Science and Experimental Medicine > MRC Unit for Lifelong Hlth and Ageing
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10166796
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