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Multi-organ impairment and long COVID: a 1-year prospective, longitudinal cohort study

Dennis, A; Cuthbertson, DJ; Wootton, D; Crooks, M; Gabbay, M; Eichert, N; Mouchti, S; ... Banerjee, A; + view all (2023) Multi-organ impairment and long COVID: a 1-year prospective, longitudinal cohort study. Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine 10.1177/01410768231154703. Green open access

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Abstract

Objectives: To determine the prevalence of organ impairment in long COVID patients at 6 and 12 months after initial symptoms and to explore links to clinical presentation. Design: Prospective cohort study. Participants: Individuals. Methods: In individuals recovered from acute COVID-19, we assessed symptoms, health status, and multi-organ tissue characterisation and function. Setting: Two non-acute healthcare settings (Oxford and London). Physiological and biochemical investigations were performed at baseline on all individuals, and those with organ impairment were reassessed. Main outcome measures: Primary outcome was prevalence of single- and multi-organ impairment at 6 and 12 months post COVID-19. Results: A total of 536 individuals (mean age 45 years, 73% female, 89% white, 32% healthcare workers, 13% acute COVID-19 hospitalisation) completed baseline assessment (median: 6 months post COVID-19); 331 (62%) with organ impairment or incidental findings had follow-up, with reduced symptom burden from baseline (median number of symptoms 10 and 3, at 6 and 12 months, respectively). Extreme breathlessness (38% and 30%), cognitive dysfunction (48% and 38%) and poor health-related quality of life (EQ-5D-5L < 0.7; 57% and 45%) were common at 6 and 12 months, and associated with female gender, younger age and single-organ impairment. Single- and multi-organ impairment were present in 69% and 23% at baseline, persisting in 59% and 27% at follow-up, respectively. Conclusions: Organ impairment persisted in 59% of 331 individuals followed up at 1 year post COVID-19, with implications for symptoms, quality of life and longer-term health, signalling the need for prevention and integrated care of long COVID. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT04369807

Type: Article
Title: Multi-organ impairment and long COVID: a 1-year prospective, longitudinal cohort study
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1177/01410768231154703
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1177/01410768231154703
Language: English
Additional information: This is an open access article under the CC BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Keywords: COVID-19, integrated care, long COVID, organ impairment, prevention, quality of life
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Health Informatics
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10165749
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