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Depth filter material process interaction in the harvest of mammalian cells

Parau, Maria; Pullen, James; Bracewell, Daniel G; (2023) Depth filter material process interaction in the harvest of mammalian cells. Biotechnol Prog , Article e3329. 10.1002/btpr.3329. (In press). Green open access

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Abstract

Upstream advances have led to increased mAb titers above 5 g/L in 14-day fed-batch cultures. This is accompanied by higher cell densities and process-related impurities such as DNA and Host Cell Protein (HCP), which have caused challenges for downstream operations. Depth filtration remains a popular choice for harvesting CHO cell culture, and there is interest in utilising these to remove process-related impurities at the harvest stage. Operation of the harvest stage has also been shown to affect the performance of the Protein A chromatography step. In addition, manufacturers are looking to move away from natural materials such as cellulose and Diatomaceous Earth (DE) for better filter consistency and security of supply. Therefore, there is an increased need for further understanding and knowledge of depth filtration. This study investigates the effect of depth filter material and loading on the Protein A resin lifetime with an industrially relevant high cell density feed material (40 million cells/mL). It focuses on the retention of process-related impurities such as DNA and HCP through breakthrough studies and a novel confocal microscopy method for imaging foulant in-situ. An increase in loading of the primary-synthetic filter by a third, led to earlier DNA breakthrough in the secondary filter, with DNA concentration at a throughput of 50 L/m2 being more than double. Confocal imaging of the depth filters showed that the foulant was pushed forward into the filter structure with higher loading. The additional two layers in the primary-synthetic filter led to better pressure profiles in both primary and secondary filters but did not help to retain HCP or DNA. Reduced filtrate clarity, as measured by OD600, was 1.6 fold lower in the final filtrate where a synthetic filter train was used. This was also associated with precipitation in the Protein A column feed. Confocal imaging of resin after 100 cycles showed that DNA build-up around the outside of the bead was associated with synthetic filter trains, leading to potential mass transfer problems.

Type: Article
Title: Depth filter material process interaction in the harvest of mammalian cells
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1002/btpr.3329
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1002/btpr.3329
Language: English
Additional information: © 2023 The Authors. Biotechnology Progress published by Wiley Periodicals LLC on behalf of American Institute of Chemical Engineers. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science > Dept of Biochemical Engineering
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10165495
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