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Pilot study of optical coherence tomography angiography-derived microvascular metrics in hands and feet of healthy and diabetic people

Untracht, GR; Dikaios, N; Durrani, AK; Bapir, M; Sarunic, MV; Sampson, DD; Heiss, C; (2023) Pilot study of optical coherence tomography angiography-derived microvascular metrics in hands and feet of healthy and diabetic people. Scientific Reports , 13 (1) , Article 1122. 10.1038/s41598-022-26871-y. Green open access

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Abstract

Optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) is a non-invasive, high-resolution imaging modality with growing application in dermatology and microvascular assessment. Accepted reference values for OCTA-derived microvascular parameters in skin do not yet exist but need to be established to drive OCTA into the clinic. In this pilot study, we assess a range of OCTA microvascular metrics at rest and after post-occlusive reactive hyperaemia (PORH) in the hands and feet of 52 healthy people and 11 people with well-controlled type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). We calculate each metric, measure test–retest repeatability, and evaluate correlation with demographic risk factors. Our study delivers extremity-specific, age-dependent reference values and coefficients of repeatability of nine microvascular metrics at baseline and at the maximum of PORH. Significant differences are not seen for age-dependent microvascular metrics in hand, but they are present for several metrics in the foot. Significant differences are observed between hand and foot, both at baseline and maximum PORH, for most of the microvascular metrics with generally higher values in the hand. Despite a large variability over a range of individuals, as is expected based on heterogeneous ageing phenotypes of the population, the test–retest repeatability is 3.5% to 18% of the mean value for all metrics, which highlights the opportunities for OCTA-based studies in larger cohorts, for longitudinal monitoring, and for assessing the efficacy of interventions. Additionally, branchpoint density in the hand and foot and changes in vessel diameter in response to PORH stood out as good discriminators between healthy and T2DM groups, which indicates their potential value as biomarkers. This study, building on our previous work, represents a further step towards standardised OCTA in clinical practice and research.

Type: Article
Title: Pilot study of optical coherence tomography angiography-derived microvascular metrics in hands and feet of healthy and diabetic people
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1038/s41598-022-26871-y
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-022-26871-y
Language: English
Additional information: Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
Keywords: Biomarkers, Imaging and sensing
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Institute of Ophthalmology
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10164342
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