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Long-term survival in people with transthyretin amyloid cardiomyopathy who took tafamidis: A Plain Language Summary

Elliott, Perry; Drachman, Brian M; Gottlieb, Stephen S; Hoffman, James E; Hummel, Scott L; Lenihan, Daniel J; Ebede, Ben; ... Shah, Sanjiv J; + view all (2023) Long-term survival in people with transthyretin amyloid cardiomyopathy who took tafamidis: A Plain Language Summary. Future Cardiology 10.2217/fca-2022-0096. (In press). Green open access

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Abstract

WHAT IS THIS PLAIN LANGUAGE SUMMARY ABOUT?: This summary presents the results from an ongoing, long-term extension study that followed an earlier study called ATTR-ACT. People who took part in this extension study and ATTR-ACT have a type of heart disease known as transthyretin amyloid cardiomyopathy (ATTR-CM for short), which causes heart failure and death. In ATTR-ACT, people took either a medicine called tafamidis or a placebo (a pill that looks like the study drug but does not contain any active ingredients) for up to 2½ years. So far, in the long-term extension study, people have continued taking tafamidis, or switched from taking a placebo to tafamidis, for another 2½ years. Researchers looked at how many people died in ATTR-ACT and the extension study. The long-term extension study is expected to end in 2027, so these are interim (not final) results. WHAT DID RESEARCHERS FIND OUT?: In the extension study of ATTR-ACT, the risk of dying was lower in people who took tafamidis continuously throughout ATTR-ACT and the extension study than in people who took placebo in ATTR-ACT and switched to tafamidis in the extension study. WHAT DO THE RESULTS MEAN?: Taking tafamidis increases how long people with ATTR-CM live. People with ATTR-CM who take tafamidis early and continuously are more likely to live longer than those who do not. These results highlight the importance of early detection and treatment in people with ATTR-CM. Clinical Trial Registration: NCT01994889 (ClinicalTrials.gov) Clinical Trial Registration: NCT02791230 (ClinicalTrials.gov).

Type: Article
Title: Long-term survival in people with transthyretin amyloid cardiomyopathy who took tafamidis: A Plain Language Summary
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.2217/fca-2022-0096
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.2217/fca-2022-0096
Language: English
Additional information: © The Authors 2022. Original content in this paper is licensed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) Licence (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).
Keywords: amyloidosis, cardiomyopathy, heart failure, lay summary, plain language summary, quality of life, tafamidis, transthyretin
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science > Clinical Science
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10164177
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