UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Testing the effects of mass drug administration of azithromycin on mortality and other outcomes among 1-11-month-old infants in Mali (LAKANA): study protocol for a cluster-randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded, parallel-group, three-arm clinical trial

Adubra, Laura; Alber, Dagmar; Ashorn, Per; Ashorn, Ulla; Cheung, Yin Bun; Cloutman-Green, Elaine; Diallo, Fatoumata; ... LAKANA Trial Team; + view all (2023) Testing the effects of mass drug administration of azithromycin on mortality and other outcomes among 1-11-month-old infants in Mali (LAKANA): study protocol for a cluster-randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded, parallel-group, three-arm clinical trial. Trials , 24 , Article 5. 10.1186/s13063-022-06966-7. Green open access

[thumbnail of Testing the effects of mass drug administration of azithromycin on mortality and other outcomes among 1-11-month-old infants.pdf]
Preview
Text
Testing the effects of mass drug administration of azithromycin on mortality and other outcomes among 1-11-month-old infants.pdf - Other

Download (2MB) | Preview

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Mass drug administration (MDA) of azithromycin (AZI) has been shown to reduce under-5 mortality in some but not all sub-Saharan African settings. A large-scale cluster-randomized trial conducted in Malawi, Niger, and Tanzania suggested that the effect differs by country, may be stronger in infants, and may be concentrated within the first 3 months after treatment. Another study found no effect when azithromycin was given concomitantly with seasonal malaria chemoprevention (SMC). Given the observed heterogeneity and possible effect modification by other co-interventions, further trials are needed to determine the efficacy in additional settings and to determine the most effective treatment regimen. METHODS: LAKANA stands for Large-scale Assessment of the Key health-promoting Activities of two New mass drug administration regimens with Azithromycin. The LAKANA trial is designed to address the mortality and health impacts of 4 or 2 annual rounds of azithromycin MDA delivered to 1-11-month-old (29-364 days) infants, in a high-mortality and malaria holoendemic Malian setting where there is a national SMC program. Participating villages (clusters) are randomly allocated in a ratio of 3:2:4 to three groups: placebo (control):4-dose AZI:2-dose AZI. The primary outcome measured is mortality. Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) will be monitored closely before, during, and after the intervention and both among those receiving and those not receiving MDA with the study drugs. Other outcomes, from a subset of villages, comprise efficacy outcomes related to morbidity, growth and nutritional status, outcomes related to the mechanism of azithromycin activity through measures of malaria parasitemia and inflammation, safety outcomes (AMR, adverse and serious adverse events), and outcomes related to the implementation of the intervention documenting feasibility, acceptability, and economic aspects. The enrolment commenced in October 2020 and is planned to be completed by the end of 2022. The expected date of study completion is December 2024. DISCUSSION: If LAKANA provides evidence in support of a positive mortality benefit resulting from azithromycin MDA, it will significantly contribute to the options for successfully promoting child survival in Mali, and elsewhere in sub-Saharan Africa. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT04424511. Registered on 11 June 2020.

Type: Article
Title: Testing the effects of mass drug administration of azithromycin on mortality and other outcomes among 1-11-month-old infants in Mali (LAKANA): study protocol for a cluster-randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded, parallel-group, three-arm clinical trial
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1186/s13063-022-06966-7
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1186/s13063-022-06966-7
Language: English
Additional information: © The Author(s) 2023. Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated in a credit line to the data.
Keywords: Antibiotic, Antimicrobial resistance, Azithromycin, Growth, Infant, Infection, Inflammation, Morbidity, Mortality, Placebo, Randomized controlled trial, Humans, Infant, Anti-Bacterial Agents, Azithromycin, Infant Mortality, Malaria, Mali, Mass Drug Administration, Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic, Treatment Outcome
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > Infection, Immunity and Inflammation Dept
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10162926
Downloads since deposit
18Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item