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Association of air pollution with dementia: A systematic review with meta-analysis including new cohort data from China

Tang, Jie; Chen, Anthony; He, Fan; Shipley, Martin; Nevill, Alan; Coe, Hugh; Hu, Zhi; ... Chen, Ruoling; + view all (2022) Association of air pollution with dementia: A systematic review with meta-analysis including new cohort data from China. Environmental Research , Article 115048. 10.1016/j.envres.2022.115048. (In press).

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Abstract

It remains unclear whether a total exposure to air pollution (AP) is associated with an increased risk of dementia. Little is known on the association in low- and middle-income countries. Two cohort studies in China (in Anhui cohort 1402 older adults aged ≥ 60 followed up for 10 years; in Zhejiang cohort 6115 older adults followed up for 5 years) were contacted to examine particulate matter - PM2.5 associated with all dementia and air quality index (AQI) with Alzheimer's disease, respectively. A systematic literature review and meta-analysis was performed following worldwide literature searched until May 20, 2020 to identify 15 population-based cohort studies examining the association of AP with dementia (or any specific type of dementia) through PubMed, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, SocINDEX, CINHAL, and CNKI. The cohort studies in China showed a significantly increased relative risk (RR) of dementia in relation to AP exposure; in Anhui cohort the adjusted RR was 2.14 (95% CI 1.00-4.56) in people with PM2.5 exposure at ≥ 64.5 μg/m3 versus <63.5 μg/m3 and in Zhejiang cohort the adjusted RR was 2.28 (1.07-4.87) in AQI>90 versus ≤ 80. The systematic review revealed that all 15 studies were undertaken in high income countries/regions, with inconsistent findings. While they had reasonably good overall quality of studies, seven studies did not adjust smoking in analysis and 13 did not account for depression. Pooling all eligible data demonstrated that dementia risk increased with the total AP exposure (1.13, 1.08-1.19). In air pollutant analysis, it significantly increased with PM2.5 (1.06, 1.03-1.10 in 2nd tertile exposure; 1.13, 1.07-1.19 in 3rd tertile versus 1st tertile), PM10 (1.05, 0.86-1.29; 1.62, 0.60-4.36), carbon monoxide (1.69, 0.72-3.93; 1.52, 1.35-1.71), nitrogen dioxide (1.06, 1.03-1.09; 1.18, 1.10-1.28) and nitrogen oxides (1.09, 1.04-1.15; 1.26, 1.13-1.41), but not ozone. Controlling air pollution and targeting on specific pollutants would reduce dementia globally.

Type: Article
Title: Association of air pollution with dementia: A systematic review with meta-analysis including new cohort data from China
Location: Netherlands
DOI: 10.1016/j.envres.2022.115048
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envres.2022.115048
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: Air pollution, Carbon monoxide, Dementia, Nitrogen oxide, Particulate matters, Sulfur dioxide
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Epidemiology and Public Health
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10162566
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