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Optical pulse labeling studies reveal exogenous seeding slows α-synuclein clearance

Croft, Cara L; Paterno, Giavanna; Vause, Ava R; Rowe, Lyla A; Ryu, Daniel H; Goodwin, Marshall S; Moran, Corey A; ... Golde, Todd E; + view all (2022) Optical pulse labeling studies reveal exogenous seeding slows α-synuclein clearance. npj Parkinson's Disease , 8 , Article 173. 10.1038/s41531-022-00434-4. Green open access

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Abstract

The accumulation of α-synuclein (α-syn) in intracellular formations known as Lewy bodies (LBs) is associated with several neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson's disease and Lewy Body Dementia. There is still limited understanding of how α-syn and LB formation is associated with cellular dysfunction and degeneration in these diseases. To examine the clearance and production dynamics of α-syn we transduced organotypic murine brain slice cultures (BSCs) with recombinant adeno-associated viruses (rAAVs) to express Dendra2-tagged human wild-type (WT) and mutant A53T α-syn, with and without the addition of exogenous α-syn fibrillar seeds and tracked them over several weeks in culture using optical pulse labeling. We found that neurons expressing WT or mutant A53T human α-syn show similar rates of α-syn turnover even when insoluble, phosphorylated Ser129 α-syn has accumulated. Taken together, this data reveals α-syn aggregation and overexpression, pSer129 α-syn, nor the A53T mutation affect α-syn dynamics in this system. Prion-type seeding with exogenous α-syn fibrils significantly slows α-syn turnover, in the absence of toxicity but is associated with the accumulation of anti-p62 immunoreactivity and Thiazin Red positivity. Prion-type induction of α-syn aggregation points towards a potential protein clearance deficit in the presence of fibrillar seeds and the ease of this system to explore precise mechanisms underlying these processes. This system facilitates the exploration of α-syn protein dynamics over long-term culture periods. This platform can further be exploited to provide mechanistic insight on what drives this slowing of α-syn turnover and how therapeutics, other genes or different α-syn mutations may affect α-syn protein dynamics.

Type: Article
Title: Optical pulse labeling studies reveal exogenous seeding slows α-synuclein clearance
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1038/s41531-022-00434-4
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41531-022-00434-4
Language: English
Additional information: This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > UK Dementia Research Institute
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10162398
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