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Hydrogen peroxide induced by nerve injury promotes axon regeneration via Connective Tissue Growth Factor

Negro, Samuele; Lauria, Fabio; Stazi, Marco; Tebaldi, Toma; D’Este, Giorgia; Pirazzini, Marco; Megighian, Aram; ... Rigoni, Michela; + view all (2023) Hydrogen peroxide induced by nerve injury promotes axon regeneration via Connective Tissue Growth Factor. Acta Neuropathologica Communications , 10 , Article 189. 10.1186/s40478-022-01495-5. Green open access

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Abstract

Regeneration of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) leverages on extensive exchange of factors released from motor axon terminals (MATs), muscle fibers and perisynaptic Schwann cells (PSCs), among which hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is a major pro-regenerative signal. To identify critical determinants of NMJ remodeling in response to injury, we performed temporal transcriptional profiling of NMJs from 2 month-old mice during MAT degeneration/regeneration, and cross-referenced the differentially expressed genes with those elicited by H2O2 in SCs. We identified an enrichment in extracellular matrix (ECM) transcripts, including Connective Tissue Growth Factor (Ctgf), which is usually expressed during development. We discovered that Ctgf levels are increased in a Yes-associated protein (YAP)-dependent fashion in response to rapid, local H2O2 signaling generated by stressed mitochondria in the injured sciatic nerve, a finding highlighting the importance of signals triggered by mechanical force to motor nerve repair. Through sequestration of Ctgf or inactivation of H2O2, we delayed the recovery of neuromuscular function by impairing SC migration and, in turn, axon-oriented re-growth. These data indicate that H2O2 and its downstream effector Ctgf are pro-regenerative factors that enable axonal growth, and reveal a striking ECM remodeling process during nerve regeneration upon local H2O2 signaling. Our study identifies key transcriptomic changes at the regenerating NMJ, providing a rich source of pro-regenerative factors with potential for alleviating the consequences of peripheral nerve injuries.

Type: Article
Title: Hydrogen peroxide induced by nerve injury promotes axon regeneration via Connective Tissue Growth Factor
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1186/s40478-022-01495-5
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1186/s40478-022-01495-5
Language: English
Additional information: Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated in a credit line to the data.
Keywords: Connective tissue growth factor, Hydrogen peroxide, Nerve regeneration, Neuromuscular junction, Schwann cells, Yes-associated protein
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Department of Neuromuscular Diseases
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10161690
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