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Mycobacterium tuberculosis senses host Interferon-γ via the membrane protein MmpL10

Ahmed, Mohamed; Mackenzie, Jared; Tezera, Liku; Krause, Robert; Truebody, Barry; Garay-Baquero, Diana; Vallejo, Andres; ... Leslie, Alasdair; + view all (2022) Mycobacterium tuberculosis senses host Interferon-γ via the membrane protein MmpL10. Commun Biol , 5 , Article 1317. 10.1038/s42003-022-04265-0. Green open access

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Abstract

Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is one of the most successful human pathogens. Several cytokines are known to increase virulence of bacterial pathogens, leading us to investigate whether Interferon-γ (IFN-γ), a central regulator of the immune defense against Mtb, has a direct effect on the bacteria. We found that recombinant and T-cell derived IFN-γ rapidly induced a dose-dependent increase in the oxygen consumption rate (OCR) of Mtb, consistent with increased bacterial respiration. This was not observed in attenuated Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), and did not occur for other cytokines tested, including TNF-α. IFN-γ binds to the cell surface of intact Mtb, but not BCG. Mass spectrometry identified mycobacterial membrane protein large 10 (MmpL10) as the transmembrane binding partner of IFN-γ, supported by molecular modelling studies. IFN-γ binding and the OCR response was absent in Mtb Δmmpl10 strain and restored by complementation with wildtype mmpl10. RNA-sequencing and RT-PCR of Mtb exposed to IFN-γ revealed a distinct transcriptional profile, including genes involved in virulence. In a 3D granuloma model, IFN-γ promoted Mtb growth, which was lost in the Mtb Δmmpl10 strain and restored by complementation, supporting the involvement of MmpL10 in the response to IFN-γ. Finally, IFN-γ addition resulted in sterilization of Mtb cultures treated with isoniazid, indicating clearance of phenotypically resistant bacteria that persist in the presence of drug alone. Together our data are the first description of a mechanism allowing Mtb to respond to host immune activation that may be important in the immunopathogenesis of TB and have use in novel eradication strategies.

Type: Article
Title: Mycobacterium tuberculosis senses host Interferon-γ via the membrane protein MmpL10
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1038/s42003-022-04265-0
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1038/s42003-022-04265-0
Language: English
Additional information: This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
Keywords: Humans, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Interferon-gamma, Membrane Proteins, Mycobacterium bovis, Cytokines
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Infection and Immunity
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10161466
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