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Adolescents’ perceptions of long-term effects of cycle skilltraining

Mandic, S; Flaherty, C; Mindell, JS; Bengoechea, EG; (2022) Adolescents’ perceptions of long-term effects of cycle skilltraining. Journal of Road Safety , 33 (4) pp. 5-20. 10.33492/JRS-D-22-00031. Green open access

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Abstract

Cycling to school is uncommon among adolescents in most developed countries. Development of cycling skills through cycle skills training (CST) can reduce cycling-related safety concerns. This study examined long-term effects of CST retrospectively by comparing adolescents’ perceptions of cycling to school and their confidence to cycle to school among those who participated in CST in primary and/or intermediate school with non-participants. Adolescents (n=1,260; 51% female; 12 schools) from Dunedin (New Zealand) completed an online survey at school. Adolescents self-reported transport modes to school, perceptions of cycling to school and CST, and previous participation in and perceived benefits of school-based CST programmes. Only 1-2% adolescents usually cycled to school. Overall, 42% agreed CST would make them safer in traffic (no significant difference between CST participants (n=512) and non-participants (n=748)). Among CST participants, 32% reported that CST increased their confidence to cycle to school and those adolescents had more favourable attitudes towards CST than participants who reported no effects. In a multivariable analysis, adolescents’ perceptions that CST increased their cycling confidence were positively associated with self-efficacy for cycling to school (odds ratio (OR) (95% confidence interval (CI)): 1.33 (1.07, 1.67)), perceived school support (1.51 (1.01, 2.25)), parental cycling-related safety concerns (1.84 (1.25, 2.69)) and being Māori (6.47 (2.36, 17.7)) or other ethnic origins (2.26 (1.00, 5.10); reference: New Zealand Europeans). Therefore, CST could be a useful strategy to support adolescents’ cycling to school, ideally (as suggested in the literature) in combination with appropriate infrastructure changes and speed management measures.

Type: Article
Title: Adolescents’ perceptions of long-term effects of cycle skilltraining
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.33492/JRS-D-22-00031
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.33492/JRS-D-22-00031
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright: © The Author(s). 2022 This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author(s) and the source are credited
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Epidemiology and Public Health
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10160759
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