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Reproductive health and hemostatic issues in women and girls with congenital factor VII deficiency: A systematic review

Abdul-Kadir, Rezan; Gomez, Keith; (2022) Reproductive health and hemostatic issues in women and girls with congenital factor VII deficiency: A systematic review. Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis , 20 (12) pp. 2758-2772. 10.1111/jth.15872. Green open access

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Congenital factor VII (FVII) deficiency is an inherited bleeding disorder, with heterogenous bleeding symptoms. Women with FVII deficiency face hemostatic challenges during menstruation, ovulation, and childbirth. This systematic review evaluated prevalence and management of bleeding symptoms associated with gynecological and obstetric issues in women with FVII deficiency. METHODS: Databases (BIOSIS Previews, Current Contents Search, Embase, and MEDLINE) were searched for studies reporting FVII deficiency and gynecological or obstetric issues in women. Articles were screened using Joanna Briggs Institute checklists and relevant data extracted. RESULTS: One hundred fourteen women were identified from 62 publications. Forty-six women had severe deficiency (FVII:C < 5% or <5 IU/dl). Heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB) was the most common bleeding symptom (n = 94; 82%); hospitalization and urgent medical/surgical interventions for acute HMB episodes were required in 16 women (14%). Seven women reported ovarian bleeding (6%); other bleeding symptoms varied. Patient management was inconsistent and included hemostatic and hormonal treatments. Only four women (7%) reporting vaginal bleeding during pregnancy. Postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) occurred following 12/45 deliveries (27%; 5 [42%] requiring blood transfusion) and was not necessarily prevented by prophylaxis (8 women). CONCLUSION: Women with congenital FVII deficiency have an increased risk of HMB, ovarian bleeding, and PPH, impacting quality of life. Recognition of a bleeding disorder as the cause is often delayed. Management of bleeding complications is heterogeneous due to lack of treatment guidelines. Harmonizing severity classification of FVII deficiency may help standardize treatment strategies and development of specific guidelines for these women.

Type: Article
Title: Reproductive health and hemostatic issues in women and girls with congenital factor VII deficiency: A systematic review
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1111/jth.15872
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1111/jth.15872
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © 2022 The Authors. Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis published by Wiley Periodicals LLC on behalf of International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/), which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited and is not used for commercial purposes.
Keywords: blood coagulation disorders, gynecology, heavy menstrual bleeding, menorrhagia, obstetrics, postpartum hemorrhage
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Cancer Institute
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Cancer Institute > Research Department of Pathology
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10160472
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