UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Efficacy of remotely-delivered cognitive behavioural therapy for obsessive compulsive disorder: An updated meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials

de Pablo, Gonzalo Salazar; Pascual-Sánchez, Ana; Panchal, Urvashi; Clark, Bruce; Krebs, Georgina; (2023) Efficacy of remotely-delivered cognitive behavioural therapy for obsessive compulsive disorder: An updated meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials. Journal of Affective Disorders , 322 pp. 289-299. 10.1016/j.jad.2022.11.007. Green open access

[thumbnail of Krebs_Efficacy of remotely-delivered cognitive behavioural therapy for obsessive compulsive disorder- An updated meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials_VoR.pdf] Text
Krebs_Efficacy of remotely-delivered cognitive behavioural therapy for obsessive compulsive disorder- An updated meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials_VoR.pdf

Download (2MB)

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Despite remotely-delivered cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) being an emerging field, the evidence of its efficacy in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is limited. We aimed to estimate the efficacy of remotely-delivered CBT for OCD, compared to face-to-face CBT and non-CBT control conditions. METHODS: Randomised clinical trials (RCTs) identified through a systematic literature search of PubMed, Ovid/PsychINFO and Web of Science until 21/06/2021. Eligible studies included individuals with OCD evaluating at least one form of remotely-delivered CBT versus a control condition. Random-effects meta-analyses, sub-analyses, meta-regressions, heterogeneity analyses, publication bias assessment and quality assessment. RESULTS: Twenty-two RCTs were included (n = 1796, mean age = 27.7 years, females = 59.1 %). Remotely-delivered CBT was more efficacious than non-CBT control conditions for OCD symptoms (g = 0.936 95 % CI = 0.597-1.275, p < .001), depressive symptoms (g = 0.358, 95 % CI = 0.125-0.590, p = .003) and anxiety symptoms (g = 0.468, 95 % CI = 0.135-0.800, p = .006). There were no significant differences in efficacy between remotely-delivered CBT and face-to-face CBT for OCD symptoms (g = −0.104 95 % CI = −0.391-0.184, p = .479), depressive symptoms (g = 0.138, 95 % CI = −0.044-0.320, p = .138), anxiety symptoms (g = 0.166, 95 % CI = −0.456-0.780, p = .601) or quality of life (g = 0.057, 95 % CI = −0.178-0.292, p = .489). Higher baseline severity of OCD symptoms was associated with a lower efficacy of remotely-delivered CBT compared to face-to-face CBT (β = −0.092, p = .036). The quality of the included studies was mostly identified as “low risk of bias” (45.5 %) or “some concerns” (45.5 %). LIMITATIONS: Heterogeneity and limited evidence for some outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: Remotely-delivered CBT appears efficacious in reducing OCD symptoms and other relevant outcomes and is therefore a viable option for increasing treatment access. Preliminary evidence suggests some individuals with severe OCD may benefit more from face-to-face than remotely-delivered CBT.

Type: Article
Title: Efficacy of remotely-delivered cognitive behavioural therapy for obsessive compulsive disorder: An updated meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1016/j.jad.2022.11.007
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jad.2022.11.007
Language: English
Additional information: © 2022 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. under a Creative Commons license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
Keywords: Obsessive compulsive disorder, Cognitive behavioural therapy, Remotely-delivered therapy, Meta-analysis
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Clinical, Edu and Hlth Psychology
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10160062
Downloads since deposit
9Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item