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Indirect effects of cytomegalovirus infection: Implications for vaccine development

Moseley, Philip; Klenerman, Paul; Kadambari, Seilesh; (2023) Indirect effects of cytomegalovirus infection: Implications for vaccine development. Reviews in Medical Virology , 33 (1) , Article e2405. 10.1002/rmv.2405. Green open access

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Abstract

Development of a cytomegalovirus (CMV) vaccine is a high priority due to its significant global impact—contributing to mortality in immunosuppressed individuals, neurodevelopmental delay in infected neonates and non-genetic sensorineural hearing loss. The impact of CMV on the general population has been less well studied; however, a wide range of evidence indicates that CMV may increase the risk of atherosclerosis, cancer, immunosenescence, and progression of tuberculosis (TB) and human immunodeficiency virus. Due to the high seroprevalence of CMV worldwide, any modulation of risk by CMV is likely to have a significant impact on the epidemiology of these diseases. This review will evaluate how CMV may cause morbidity and mortality outside of the neonatal and immunosuppressed populations and consider the potential impact of a CMV vaccine on these outcomes.

Type: Article
Title: Indirect effects of cytomegalovirus infection: Implications for vaccine development
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1002/rmv.2405
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1002/rmv.2405
Language: English
Additional information: © 2022 The Authors. Reviews in Medical Virology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > Infection, Immunity and Inflammation Dept
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10159977
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