UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

An examination of sample length and reliability of the Interactional Network Tool, a new measure of group interactions in acquired brain injury

Howell, Susan; Beeke, Suzanne; Sinnott, Emma Louise; Varley, Rosemary; Pring, Tim; (2022) An examination of sample length and reliability of the Interactional Network Tool, a new measure of group interactions in acquired brain injury. Aphasiology 10.1080/02687038.2022.2118517. (In press). Green open access

[thumbnail of Varley_An examination of sample length and reliability of the Interactional Network Tool a new measure of group interactions in acquire.pdf]
Preview
Text
Varley_An examination of sample length and reliability of the Interactional Network Tool a new measure of group interactions in acquire.pdf

Download (1MB) | Preview

Abstract

Background: Conversation is challenging to measure. Quantitative and qualitative measures need to be sensitive to the conversation context, the purpose and the variable contributions of participants in order to capture meaningful change. Measurements also need to be consistent across independent raters. The reliability of global observational rating scales across differing sample lengths has previously been investigated. An investigation into the effects of sample length on inter-rater reliability using a behavioural frequency measure is a new field of research. Aims: This study reports on the inter-rater reliability of the Interactional Network Tool (INT), a behavioural coding system for use with group interaction data. It examines the effects of sample length on reliability using a refined coding system designed to improve the speed and efficiency of use in clinical settings. Methods: Fourteen video samples of group interactions for people with acquired brain injury were prepared for analysis. Two raters independently coded the films using the INT coding system. Individual code reliability was calculated using intra-class correlations (ICCs). Codes were combined to form a new coding structure. Reliability of the new codes was calculated using intra-class correlations across four sample lengths (5,10,15 and 20 minutes). A one-way analysis of variance was used to compare the means of the four sample lengths. Outcomes and Results: Acceptable inter-rater reliability was achieved using the refined INT coding system. There was no difference between the four sample lengths. Conclusions: These findings indicate that trained clinicians using the INT in clinical practice can achieve a reliable measure of participation in a group interaction from short samples. Validation with other clinical groups is now indicated.

Type: Article
Title: An examination of sample length and reliability of the Interactional Network Tool, a new measure of group interactions in acquired brain injury
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1080/02687038.2022.2118517
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1080/02687038.2022.2118517
Language: English
Additional information: © 2022 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, and is not altered, transformed, or built upon in any way
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Language and Cognition
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10155175
Downloads since deposit
28Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item