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Hypoxia mimetics restore bone biomineralisation in hyperglycaemic environments

Rezaei, Azadeh; Li, Yutong; Turmaine, Mark; Bertazzo, Sergio; Howard, Christopher A; Arnett, Timothy R; Shakib, Kaveh; (2022) Hypoxia mimetics restore bone biomineralisation in hyperglycaemic environments. Scientific Reports , 12 (1) , Article 13944. 10.1038/s41598-022-18067-1. Green open access

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Abstract

Diabetic patients have an increased risk of fracture and an increased occurrence of impaired fracture healing. Diabetic and hyperglycaemic conditions have been shown to impair the cellular response to hypoxia, via an inhibited hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1α pathway. We investigated, using an in vitro hyperglycaemia bone tissue engineering model (and a multidisciplinary bone characterisation approach), the differing effects of glucose levels, hypoxia and chemicals known to stabilise HIF-1α (CoCl2 and DMOG) on bone formation. Hypoxia (1% O2) inhibited bone nodule formation and resulted in discrete biomineralisation as opposed to the mineralised extracellular collagen fibres found in normoxia (20% O2). Unlike hypoxia, the use of hypoxia mimetics did not prevent nodule formation in normal glucose level. Hyperglycaemic conditions (25 mM and 50 mM glucose) inhibited biomineralisation. Interestingly, both hypoxia mimetics (CoCl2 and DMOG) partly restored hyperglycaemia inhibited bone nodule formation. These results highlight the difference in osteoblast responses between hypoxia mimetics and actual hypoxia and suggests a role of HIF-1α stabilisation in bone biomineralisation that extends that of promoting neovascularisation, or other system effects associated with hypoxia and bone regeneration in vivo. This study demonstrates that targeting the HIF pathway may represent a promising strategy for bone regeneration in diabetic patients.

Type: Article
Title: Hypoxia mimetics restore bone biomineralisation in hyperglycaemic environments
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1038/s41598-022-18067-1
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-022-18067-1
Language: English
Additional information: Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
Keywords: Bone Regeneration, Cell Hypoxia, Glucose, Humans, Hyperglycemia, Hypoxia, Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1, alpha Subunit, Osteogenesis
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science > Dept of Med Phys and Biomedical Eng
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS
UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci > Department of Surgical Biotechnology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10154192
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