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No evidence that genetic predictors of susceptibility predict changes in core outcomes in JIA

Yarwood, Annie; Shoop-Worrall, Stephanie; López-Isac, Elena; Smith, Samantha Louise; Morris, Andrew P; Baildam, Eileen; Chieng, Alice; ... Eyre, Stephen; + view all (2022) No evidence that genetic predictors of susceptibility predict changes in core outcomes in JIA. Rheumatology , 61 (10) pp. 4136-4144. 10.1093/rheumatology/keab942. Green open access

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Abstract

Objectives: The clinical progression of JIA is unpredictable. Knowing who will develop severe disease could facilitate rapid intensification of therapies. We use genetic variants conferring susceptibility to JIA to predict disease outcome measures. / Methods: A total of 713 JIA patients with genotype data and core outcome variables (COVs) at diagnosis (baseline) and 1 year follow-up were identified from the Childhood Arthritis Prospective Study (CAPS). A weighted genetic risk score (GRS) was generated, including all single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) previously associated with JIA susceptibility (P-value < 5×10−08). We used multivariable linear regression to test the GRS for association with COVS (limited joint count, active joint count, physician global assessment, parent/patient general evaluation, childhood HAQ and ESR) at baseline and change in COVS from baseline to 1 year, adjusting for baseline COV and International League of Associations of Rheumatology (ILAR) category. The GRS was split into quintiles to identify high (quintile 5) and low (quintile 1) risk groups. / Results: Patients in the high-risk group for the GRS had a younger age at presentation (median low risk 7.79, median high risk 3.51). No association was observed between the GRS and any outcome measures at 1 year follow-up or baseline. / Conclusion: For the first time we have used all known JIA genetic susceptibility loci (P=<5×10−08) in a GRS to predict changes in disease outcome measured over time. Genetic susceptibility variants are poor predictors of changes in core outcome measures, it is likely that genetic factors predicting disease outcome are independent to those predicting susceptibility. The next step will be to conduct a genome-wide association analysis of JIA outcome.

Type: Article
Title: No evidence that genetic predictors of susceptibility predict changes in core outcomes in JIA
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1093/rheumatology/keab942
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1093/rheumatology/keab942
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © The Author(s) 2022. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. For commercial re-use, please contact journals.permissions@oup.com.
Keywords: JIA, disease outcome, genetics
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine > Inflammation
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > Infection, Immunity and Inflammation Dept
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10154066
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