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Immediate sequential bilateral cataract surgery: patient perceptions and preferences

Malcolm, Jonathan; Leak, Christopher; Day, Alexander C; Baker, Helen; Buchan, John C; (2022) Immediate sequential bilateral cataract surgery: patient perceptions and preferences. Eye 10.1038/s41433-022-02171-7. (In press). Green open access

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Recent national data suggests that less than 0.5% of NHS cataract patients undergo immediate sequential bilateral cataract surgery (ISBCS). Since ISBCS improves service efficiency, increasing its practice may help tackle the ever-growing burden of cataract in the UK, and reduce the COVID-19 cataract backlog. Surgeon attitudes are known to be a significant barrier to increasing the practice of ISBCS. However, little is known about patient perceptions of ISBCS. METHODS: Patients at cataract clinics across three NHS hospital sites were recruited to complete an investigator-led structured questionnaire. Open-ended and closed-ended questions were used to assess awareness of ISBCS, willingness to undergo ISBCS and attitudes towards ISBCS. RESULTS: Questionnaires were completed by 183 patients. Mean participant age was 70.5 (9.9) years and 58% were female. Forty-three percent were aware of ISBCS, chiefly via clinic staff. Just over a third would choose ISBCS if given the choice, and participants that perceived they were recommended ISBCS were more likely to opt for it. The most common motivator and barrier to uptake of ISBCS was convenience and the perceived risk of complications in both eyes respectively. Concerns related to the recovery period were common, including misunderstandings, such as the need to wear eye patches that obscure both eyes. CONCLUSIONS: Our study indicates that significantly more NHS patients would be willing to undergo ISBCS if given the choice. The reluctance of surgeons to recommend ISBCS and patient misunderstandings regarding the recovery period may be limiting its uptake.

Type: Article
Title: Immediate sequential bilateral cataract surgery: patient perceptions and preferences
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1038/s41433-022-02171-7
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41433-022-02171-7
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher's terms and conditions
Keywords: Health services, Outcomes research, Public health
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Institute of Ophthalmology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10154060
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