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Rift Valley fever seropositivity in humans and domestic ruminants and associated risk factors in Sengerema, Ilala, and Rufiji districts, Tanzania

Sindato, C; Karimuribo, ED; Vairo, F; Misinzo, G; Rweyemamu, MM; Hamid, MMA; Haider, N; ... Mboera, LEG; + view all (2022) Rift Valley fever seropositivity in humans and domestic ruminants and associated risk factors in Sengerema, Ilala, and Rufiji districts, Tanzania. International Journal of Infectious Diseases , 122 pp. 559-565. 10.1016/j.ijid.2022.07.012. Green open access

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Abstract

Objectives: Data on Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) prevalence in urban settings and pastoral areas of Tanzania are scarce. We performed a cross-sectional study of RVFV seroprevalence and determinants in humans and animals from Ilala, Rufiji, and Sengerema districts of Tanzania. Methods: Blood samples from the study participants were tested for anti-RVFV immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Logistic regression was used to determine association between exposure risk practices and RVFV seropositivity. Results: The study involved 664 humans, 361 cattle, 394 goats, and 242 sheep. The overall anti-RVFV IgG seroprevalence in humans and animals was 2.1% (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.01-0.04) and 9.5% (n = 95, 95% CI 0.08-0.12), respectively. Seroprevalence in humans in Rufiji, Ilala, and Sengerema was 3.0% (n = 225, 95% CI 0.01-0.06), 1.8% (n = 230, 95% CI-0.005- 0.04), and 1.4% (n = 209, 95% CI 0.01-0.04), respectively (P >0.05). Seroprevalence in animals in Sengerema, Rufiji, and Ilala was 12.1% (n = 40, 95% CI 0.09-0.16), 11.1% (n = 37, 95% CI 0.08-0.15), and 5.4% (n = 18, 95% CI 0.03-0.08), respectively (P = 0.006). Handling of carcasses increased the odds of RVFV seropositivity 12-fold (odds ratio 11.84, 95% CI 1.97-71.16). Conclusion: The study confirms previous occurrence of RVFV in multiple species in the study districts. Animal handling practices appear to be essential determinants of seropositivity.

Type: Article
Title: Rift Valley fever seropositivity in humans and domestic ruminants and associated risk factors in Sengerema, Ilala, and Rufiji districts, Tanzania
Location: Canada
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1016/j.ijid.2022.07.012
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijid.2022.07.012
Language: English
Additional information: © 2022 Published by Elsevier Ltd. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/)
Keywords: Humans, Rift Valley fever, Risk practices, Ruminants, Seropositivity, Tanzania
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Infection and Immunity
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10153382
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