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Sugar-sweetened beverages, artificially sweetened beverages and natural juices and risk of inflammatory bowel disease: a cohort study of 121,490 participants

Fu, Tian; Chen, Hui; Chen, Xuejie; Sun, Yuhao; Xie, Ying; Deng, Minzi; Hesketh, Therese; ... Chen, Jie; + view all (2022) Sugar-sweetened beverages, artificially sweetened beverages and natural juices and risk of inflammatory bowel disease: a cohort study of 121,490 participants. Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics 10.1111/apt.17149. (In press). Green open access

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Abstract

Background: Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) have been related to high-sugar dietary patterns, but the associations of different types of beverages with IBD risk are largely unknown. Aims: To examine the associations of intake of sugar-sweetened beverages, artificially sweetened beverages and natural juices with IBD risk. Methods: This cohort study included 121,490 participants in the UK Biobank who were free of IBD at recruitment. Intake of beverages was obtained from repeated 24-h diet recalls in 2009–2012. Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate the hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for associations of beverage intake with IBD risk. Results: During a mean (standard deviation) follow-up of 10.2 (1.5) years, we documented 510 incident IBD cases, (143 Crohn's disease (CD) and 367 ulcerative colitis (UC)). Compared to non-consumers, participants consuming >1 unit per day of sugar-sweetened beverages were at significantly higher risk of IBD (HR 1.51, 95% CI 1.11–2.05), but the trend was non-significant (p-trend = 0.170). This association was significant for CD (HR 2.05, 95% CI 1.22–3.46), but not for UC (HR 1.31, 95% CI 0.89–1.92). We did not observe significant associations for the consumption of artificially sweetened beverages or natural juices. Conclusions: Our findings suggest an association between consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages, rather than artificially sweetened beverages or natural juices, and IBD risk.

Type: Article
Title: Sugar-sweetened beverages, artificially sweetened beverages and natural juices and risk of inflammatory bowel disease: a cohort study of 121,490 participants
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1111/apt.17149
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1111/apt.17149
Language: English
Additional information: © 2022 The Authors. Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited and is not used for commercial purposes.
Keywords: Science & Technology, Life Sciences & Biomedicine, Gastroenterology & Hepatology, Pharmacology & Pharmacy, CARDIOVASCULAR-DISEASE, RECOVERY BIOMARKERS, 5 VALIDATION, UK BIOBANK, CONSUMPTION, ASSOCIATION, PATTERNS, PROTEIN, OBESITY
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute for Global Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10153080
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