UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Making it work: Fathers' nonstandard work schedules and parenting activities

Zilanawala, A; McMunn, A; (2022) Making it work: Fathers' nonstandard work schedules and parenting activities. Journal of Marriage and Family 10.1111/jomf.12853. (In press). Green open access

[thumbnail of J of Marriage and Family - 2022 - Zilanawala - Making it work  Fathers  nonstandard work schedules and parenting activities.pdf]
Preview
PDF
J of Marriage and Family - 2022 - Zilanawala - Making it work Fathers nonstandard work schedules and parenting activities.pdf - Published Version

Download (801kB) | Preview

Abstract

Objective: We examined associations between types of nonstandard work schedules among fathers, couple-level work schedules, and fathers' parenting activities in infancy and middle childhood in the United Kingdom. Background: An emerging body of literature has interrogated the implications of fathers' nonstandard schedules for their parenting. The evidence is mixed owing to the range of child ages investigated and country context. It remains unclear whether nonstandard working hours are related to different types of parenting activities. Method: The authors used the Millennium Cohort Study, a nationally representative birth cohort from the UK, and two measures of fathers' parenting: basic care (9-month and 7-year interviews) and play and recreation (7 years). Regression models predicted parenting from fathers' nonstandard work schedules at 9-months (n = 11,412) and 7 years (n = 7791). Results: Fathers who regularly worked night schedules engaged in more basic care in both infancy and middle childhood, compared to fathers who regularly worked standard schedules. Evening schedules were related to lower levels of basic care among infants and 7-year-olds. There were stronger positive associations with parenting when considering mothers' work schedules. Fathers' parenting at both ages was higher in families in which both parents worked at nonstandard times or parents were engaged in split-shift schedules. Conclusion: Fathers' night work schedules were associated with more parenting activities in infancy and middle childhood. The combination of fathers' and mothers' work schedules were relatively more important than considering fathers' work schedules in isolation.

Type: Article
Title: Making it work: Fathers' nonstandard work schedules and parenting activities
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1111/jomf.12853
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1111/jomf.12853
Language: English
Additional information: © 2022 The Authors. Journal of Marriage and Family published by Wiley Periodicals LLC on behalf of National Council on Family Relations. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Epidemiology and Public Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10150662
Downloads since deposit
61Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item