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Immune boosting by B.1.1.529 (Omicron) depends on previous SARS-CoV-2 exposure

Reynolds, Catherine J; Pade, Corinna; Gibbons, Joseph M; Otter, Ashley D; Lin, Kai-Min; Muñoz Sandoval, Diana; Pieper, Franziska P; ... Moon, James C; + view all (2022) Immune boosting by B.1.1.529 (Omicron) depends on previous SARS-CoV-2 exposure. Science 10.1126/science.abq1841. (In press). Green open access

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Abstract

The Omicron, or Pango lineage B.1.1.529, variant of SARS-CoV-2 carries multiple spike mutations with high transmissibility and partial neutralizing antibody (nAb) escape. Vaccinated individuals show protection from severe disease, often attributed to primed cellular immunity. We investigated T and B cell immunity against B.1.1.529 in triple mRNA vaccinated healthcare workers (HCW) with different SARS-CoV-2 infection histories. B and T cell immunity against previous variants of concern was enhanced in triple vaccinated individuals, but magnitude of T and B cell responses against B.1.1.529 spike protein was reduced. Immune imprinting by infection with the earlier B.1.1.7 (Alpha) variant resulted in less durable binding antibody against B.1.1.529. Previously infection-naïve HCW who became infected during the B.1.1.529 wave showed enhanced immunity against earlier variants, but reduced nAb potency and T cell responses against B.1.1.529 itself. Previous Wuhan Hu-1 infection abrogated T cell recognition and any enhanced cross-reactive neutralizing immunity on infection with B.1.1.529.

Type: Article
Title: Immune boosting by B.1.1.529 (Omicron) depends on previous SARS-CoV-2 exposure
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1126/science.abq1841
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1126/science.abq1841
Language: English
Additional information: © 2022 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works. Distributed under a Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0 (CC BY).
Keywords: COVIDsortium Investigators‡, COVIDsortium Immune Correlates Network‡
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science > Clinical Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10150562
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