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Inflammatory stress responses and future mental health outcomes in people with type 2 diabetes

Panagi, Laura; Poole, Lydia; Steptoe, Andrew; Hackett, Ruth A; (2022) Inflammatory stress responses and future mental health outcomes in people with type 2 diabetes. Brain, Behavior, & Immunity - Health , 23 , Article 100472. 10.1016/j.bbih.2022.100472. Green open access

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Abstract

Background: Inflammatory dysregulation may be linked with mental health disturbances in people with Type 2 Diabetes (T2D), however no previous studies have examined longitudinal associations between inflammatory stress responses and mental health outcomes in T2D. Purpose: To better understand the biological mechanisms that might predispose people with T2D to poor mental health in the future. Methods: At baseline, 140 participants with T2D participated in a laboratory stress testing study (mean age = 64 years). Participants underwent two mental stress tasks and blood was sampled before and up to 45 min post-stress to detect plasma interleukin (IL)-6. The Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression scale and the Short Form-36 Health Survey were completed at baseline and 7.5 years later. We tested associations between IL-6 stress responses and a) depression symptoms and b) mental health-related quality of life (QoL) at baseline and at follow-up using linear regression analyses adjusting for age, sex, and body mass index (BMI). Results: Up to 66 participants provided follow-up data. In cross-sectional analyses, increased IL-6 stress responses immediately post-task were associated with lower mental health-related quality of life (B = -21.73, p = 0.005, 95% CI [-36.82, -6.63]) adjusting for age, sex, and BMI. In longitudinal analyses, increased IL-6 stress responses at 45 min post-task were associated with increased depressive symptoms (B = 10.31 p = 0.048, 95% CI [0.10, 20.51]) and decreased mental health-related QoL (B = -21.18 p = 0.031, 95% CI [-40.34, -2.02]) adjusting for age, sex, and BMI. The association between the 45-min IL-6 response and depressive symptoms at follow-up was diminished after further adjustment for physical health-related QoL and baseline depressive symptoms (B = 10.14, p = 0.055, 95% CI [-0.21,20.48]). Conclusions: This study supports the link between inflammatory stress responsivity and future mental health outcomes in people with T2D. Further research involving a larger sample size is required.

Type: Article
Title: Inflammatory stress responses and future mental health outcomes in people with type 2 diabetes
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1016/j.bbih.2022.100472
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bbih.2022.100472
Language: English
Additional information: This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third-party material in this article are included in the Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Keywords: Depressive symptoms, Follow-up, Interleukin-6, Laboratory stress testing, Longitudinal, Mental health, Quality of life, Type 2 diabetes
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Epidemiology and Public Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Health Informatics
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Behavioural Science and Health
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10150508
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