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Linking gastrointestinal microbiota and metabolome dynamics to clinical outcomes in paediatric haematopoietic stem cell transplantation

Vaitkute, Gintare; Panic, Gordana; Alber, Dagmar G; Faizura-Yeop, Intan; Cloutman-Green, Elaine; Swann, Jonathan; Veys, Paul; ... Bajaj-Elliott, Mona; + view all (2022) Linking gastrointestinal microbiota and metabolome dynamics to clinical outcomes in paediatric haematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Microbiome , 10 , Article 89. 10.1186/s40168-022-01270-7. Green open access

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Abstract

Background: Haematopoietic stem cell transplantation is a curative procedure for a variety of conditions. Despite major advances, a plethora of adverse clinical outcomes can develop post-transplantation including graft-versus-host disease and infections, which remain the major causes of morbidity and mortality. There is increasing evidence that the gastrointestinal microbiota is associated with clinical outcomes post-haematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Herein, we investigated the longitudinal dynamics of the gut microbiota and metabolome and potential associations to clinical outcomes in paediatric haematopoietic stem cell transplantation at a single centre. Results: On admission (baseline), the majority of patients presented with a different gut microbial composition in comparison with healthy control children with a significantly lower alpha diversity. A further, marked decrease in alpha diversity was observed immediately post-transplantation and in most microbial diversity, and composition did not return to baseline status whilst hospitalised. Longitudinal trajectories identified continuous fluctuations in microbial composition, with the dominance of a single taxon in a significant proportion of patients. Using pam clustering, three clusters were observed in the dataset. Cluster 1 was common pre-transplantation, characterised by a higher abundance of Clostridium XIVa, Bacteroides and Lachnospiraceae; cluster 2 and cluster 3 were more common post-transplantation with a higher abundance of Streptococcus and Staphylococcus in the former whilst Enterococcus, Enterobacteriaceae and Escherichia predominated in the latter. Cluster 3 was also associated with a higher risk of viraemia. Likewise, further multivariate analysis reveals Enterobacteriaceae, viraemia, use of total parenteral nutrition and various antimicrobials contributing towards cluster 3, Streptococcaceae, Staphylococcaceae, Neisseriaceae, vancomycin and metronidazole contributing towards cluster 2. Lachnospiraceae, Ruminococcaceae, Bifidobacteriaceae and not being on total parenteral nutrition contributed to cluster 1. Untargeted metabolomic analyses revealed changes that paralleled fluctuations in microbiota composition; importantly, low faecal butyrate was associated with a higher risk of viraemia. Conclusions: These findings highlight the frequent shifts and dominations in the gut microbiota of paediatric patients undergoing haematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The study reveals associations between the faecal microbiota, metabolome and viraemia. To identify and explore the potential of microbial biomarkers that may predict the risk of complications post-HSCT, larger multi-centre studies investigating the longitudinal microbial profiling in paediatric haematopoietic stem cell transplantation are warranted.

Type: Article
Title: Linking gastrointestinal microbiota and metabolome dynamics to clinical outcomes in paediatric haematopoietic stem cell transplantation
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1186/s40168-022-01270-7
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1186/s40168-022-01270-7
Language: English
Additional information: © The Author(s) 2022. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativeco mmons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated in a credit line to the data.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > Infection, Immunity and Inflammation Dept
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10150042
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