UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Attribution of diabetes to the development of severe liver disease in the general population

Vuorinen, M; Männistö, VT; Salomaa, V; Britton, A; Jula, A; Männistö, S; Lundqvist, A; ... Åberg, F; + view all (2022) Attribution of diabetes to the development of severe liver disease in the general population. Liver International 10.1111/liv.15296. (In press). Green open access

[thumbnail of Liver International - 2022 - Vuorinen - Attribution of diabetes to the development of severe liver disease in the general.pdf]
Preview
PDF
Liver International - 2022 - Vuorinen - Attribution of diabetes to the development of severe liver disease in the general.pdf - Published Version

Download (511kB) | Preview

Abstract

Background and Aims: Diabetes is associated with advanced liver disease and predicts mortality regardless of the primary aetiology of the liver disease. Even a family history of diabetes has been linked to advanced liver fibrosis in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). However, the fraction of liver-related outcomes in the general population that are attributable to diabetes remains unclear. Methods: The population attributable fraction (PAF) of diabetes for liver disease as a time-dependent exposure was estimated in the Finnish FINRISK study (n = 28 787) and the British Whitehall II study (n = 7855). We also assessed the predictive ability of a family history of diabetes for liver-related outcomes. Incident diabetes data were from drug purchase/reimbursement and healthcare registries (FINRISK) or follow-up examinations (Whitehall II). Incident severe liver outcomes were identified through linkage with national healthcare registries. Results: Diabetes was associated with a two-fold risk of liver-related outcomes in both the FINRISK (HR, 1.92; p <.001) and Whitehall II (HR, 2.37; p <.001) cohorts, and this remained significant after adjusting for multiple confounders. PAF analyses demonstrated that diabetes explained 12–14% of the risk for severe liver-related outcomes after 10 and 20 years of follow-up. Also, maternal diabetes increased the risk of liver-related outcomes in the FINRISK (HR, 1.43; p =.044) and Whitehall II (HR, 2.04; p =.051) cohorts. Conclusion: Approximately 12%–14% of severe liver-related outcomes are attributable to diabetes at the population level. The association between maternal diabetes and liver disease might suggest a mitochondrial genetic mechanism.

Type: Article
Title: Attribution of diabetes to the development of severe liver disease in the general population
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1111/liv.15296
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1111/liv.15296
Language: English
Additional information: © 2022 The Authors. Liver International published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non-commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made.
Keywords: cirrhosis, hepatology, hyperglycaemia
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Epidemiology and Public Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10149912
Downloads since deposit
39Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item