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Does Mode of Input Affect How Second Language Learners Create Form–Meaning Connections and Pronounce Second Language Words?

UCHIHARA, TAKUMI; WEBB, STUART; SAITO, KAZUYA; TROFIMOVICH, PAVEL; (2022) Does Mode of Input Affect How Second Language Learners Create Form–Meaning Connections and Pronounce Second Language Words? The Modern Language Journal 10.1111/modl.12775. (In press). Green open access

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Abstract

This study examined how mode of input affects the learning of pronunciation and form–meaning connection of second language (L2) words. Seventy-five Japanese learners of English were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 conditions (reading while listening, reading only, listening only), studied 40 low-frequency words while viewing their corresponding pictures, and completed a picture-naming test 3 times (before, immediately, and about 6 days after treatment). The elicited speech samples were assessed for form–meaning connection (spoken form recall) and pronunciation accuracy (accentedness, comprehensibility). Results showed that the reading-while-listening group recalled a significantly greater number of spoken word forms than did the listening-only group. Learners in the reading-while-listening and listening-only modes were judged to be less accented and more comprehensible compared to learners in the reading-only mode. However, only learners receiving spoken input without orthographic support retained more target-like (less accented) pronunciation compared to learners receiving only written input. Furthermore, sound–spelling consistency of words significantly moderated the degree to which different learning modes impacted pronunciation learning. Taken together, the findings suggest that simultaneous presentation of written and spoken forms is optimal for the development of form–meaning connection and comprehensibility of novel words but that provision of only spoken input may be beneficial for the attainment of target-like accent.

Type: Article
Title: Does Mode of Input Affect How Second Language Learners Create Form–Meaning Connections and Pronounce Second Language Words?
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1111/modl.12775
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1111/modl.12775
Language: English
Additional information: © 2022 The Authors. The Modern Language Journal published by Wiley Periodicals LLC on behalf of National Federation of Modern Language Teachers Associations, Inc. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Keywords: mode of input; vocabulary learning; pronunciation learning; orthographic influence; accentedness; comprehensibility
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education > UCL Institute of Education
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education > UCL Institute of Education > IOE - Culture, Communication and Media
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education
UCL
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10149910
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