UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Mechanisms for community prevention of violence against women in low- and middle-income countries: A realist approach to a comparative analysis of qualitative data

Lowe, Hattie; Brown, Laura; Ahmad, Ayesha; Daruwalla, Nayreen; Gram, Lu; Osrin, David; Panchal, Krishna; ... Mannell, Jenevieve; + view all (2022) Mechanisms for community prevention of violence against women in low- and middle-income countries: A realist approach to a comparative analysis of qualitative data. Social Science & Medicine , 305 , Article 115064. 10.1016/j.socscimed.2022.115064. Green open access

[thumbnail of Lowe_1-s2.0-S0277953622003707-main.pdf]
Preview
Text
Lowe_1-s2.0-S0277953622003707-main.pdf - Published Version

Download (2MB) | Preview

Abstract

Growing evidence suggests that community-based interventions in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) can effectively address harmful social norms that promote or sustain gender inequality and drive violence against women (VAW). However, understanding what actions communities are already taking to address harmful social norms and prevent VAW is an essential first step for intervention development. Towards this goal, drawing on collective action theory, we conducted a realist analysis of secondary qualitative data collected with communities in India, Afghanistan, Peru and Rwanda. We coded interview and focus-group data from 232 participants to identify the contexts, mechanisms and outcomes (CMO) relevant for community action. We synthesized CMO configurations from each dataset into a conceptual framework composed of three middle-range theories of mechanisms driving community action to prevent VAW in LMICs. Our results highlight the importance of dedicated spaces for discussing VAW, VAW leaders as positive role models, and community perceptions of VAW as a problem worthy of intervention. In Rwanda and Peru, there was strong evidence to support the operation of these mechanisms. Contextual factors, including national and local policy and programmes targeting VAW, activated mechanisms that led to community action. In India and Afghanistan, evidence for the presence of these mechanisms was weaker, with social norms about women's position and violence being a private family matter preventing communities from addressing violence. Despite contextual differences, our data demonstrated communities in all four settings were somewhere along a pathway of change towards VAW prevention. This supports the need to build future prevention interventions on pre-existing mechanisms that trigger community action, rather than implementing existing interventions without local adaptation. Our conceptual framework serves as a tool for assessing these mechanisms of community action as part of intervention development research, centring community knowledge and fostering local ownership for more relevant and sustainable VAW prevention interventions.

Type: Article
Title: Mechanisms for community prevention of violence against women in low- and middle-income countries: A realist approach to a comparative analysis of qualitative data
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2022.115064
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.socscimed.2022.115064
Language: English
Additional information: © 2022 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd. under a Creative Commons license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
Keywords: Afghanistan, Community-based interventions, India, Intervention development research, Peru, Rwanda, Violence against women
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute for Global Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute for Global Health > Infection and Population Health
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10149857
Downloads since deposit
51Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item