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Changes in adolescents' planned hospital care during the COVID-19 pandemic: analysis of linked administrative data

Mc Grath-Lone, Louise; Etoori, David; Gilbert, Ruth; Harron, Katie L; Woodman, Jenny; Blackburn, Ruth; (2022) Changes in adolescents' planned hospital care during the COVID-19 pandemic: analysis of linked administrative data. Archive of Disease Childhood 10.1136/archdischild-2021-323616. (In press). Green open access

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To describe changes in planned hospital care during the pandemic for vulnerable adolescents receiving children's social care (CSC) services or special educational needs (SEN) support, relative to their peers. DESIGN: Observational cohort in the Education and Child Health Insights from Linked Data database (linked de-identified administrative health, education and social care records of all children in England). STUDY POPULATION: All secondary school pupils in years 7-11 in academic year 2019/2020 (N=3 030 235). MAIN EXPOSURE: Receiving SEN support or CSC services. MAIN OUTCOMES: Changes in outpatient attendances and planned hospital admissions during the first 9 months of the pandemic (23 March-31 December 2020), estimated by comparing predicted with observed numbers and rates per 1000 child-years. RESULTS: A fifth of pupils (20.5%) received some form of statutory support: 14.2% received SEN support only, 3.6% received CSC services only and 2.7% received both. Decreases in planned hospital care were greater for these vulnerable adolescents than their peers: -290 vs -225 per 1000 child-years for outpatient attendances and -36 vs -16 per 1000 child-years for planned admissions. Overall, 21% of adolescents who were vulnerable disproportionately bore 25% of the decrease in outpatient attendances and 37% of the decrease in planned hospital admissions. Vulnerable adolescents were less likely than their peers to have face-to-face outpatient care. CONCLUSION: These findings indicate that socially vulnerable groups of children have high health needs, which may need to be prioritised to ensure equitable provision, including for catch-up of planned care postpandemic.

Type: Article
Title: Changes in adolescents' planned hospital care during the COVID-19 pandemic: analysis of linked administrative data
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1136/archdischild-2021-323616
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1136/archdischild-2021-323616
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: Adolescent Health, Child Health Services, Covid-19, Social work
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Health Informatics
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute for Global Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education > UCL Institute of Education
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education > UCL Institute of Education > IOE - Social Research Institute
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > Population, Policy and Practice Dept
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10149063
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