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Hyperelastic, shape‐memorable, and ultra‐cell‐adhesive degradable polycaprolactone‐polyurethane copolymer for tissue regeneration

Hong, Suk‐Min; Yoon, Ji‐Young; Cha, Jae‐Ryung; Ahn, Junyong; Mandakhbayar, Nandin; Park, Jeong Hui; Im, Junseop; ... Kim, Hae‐Won; + view all (2022) Hyperelastic, shape‐memorable, and ultra‐cell‐adhesive degradable polycaprolactone‐polyurethane copolymer for tissue regeneration. Bioengineering & Translational Medicine 10.1002/btm2.10332. Green open access

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Abstract

Novel polycaprolactone-based polyurethane (PCL-PU) copolymers with hyperelasticity, shape-memory, and ultra-cell-adhesion properties are reported as clinically applicable tissue-regenerative biomaterials. New isosorbide derivatives (propoxylated or ethoxylated ones) were developed to improve mechanical properties by enhanced reactivity in copolymer synthesis compared to the original isosorbide. Optimized PCL-PU with propoxylated isosorbide exhibited notable mechanical performance (50 MPa tensile strength and 1150% elongation with hyperelasticity under cyclic load). The shape-memory effect was also revealed in different forms (film, thread, and 3D scaffold) with 40%–80% recovery in tension or compression mode after plastic deformation. The ultra-cell-adhesive property was proven in various cell types which were reasoned to involve the heat shock protein-mediated integrin (α5 and αV) activation, as analyzed by RNA sequencing and inhibition tests. After the tissue regenerative potential (muscle and bone) was confirmed by the myogenic and osteogenic responses in vitro, biodegradability, compatible in vivo tissue response, and healing capacity were investigated with in vivo shape-memorable behavior. The currently exploited PCL-PU, with its multifunctional (hyperelastic, shape-memorable, ultra-celladhesive, and degradable) nature and biocompatibility, is considered a potential tissue- regenerative biomaterial, especially for minimally invasive surgery that requires small incisions to approach large defects with excellent regeneration capacity.

Type: Article
Title: Hyperelastic, shape‐memorable, and ultra‐cell‐adhesive degradable polycaprolactone‐polyurethane copolymer for tissue regeneration
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1002/btm2.10332
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1002/btm2.10332
Language: English
Additional information: This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third-party material in this article are included in the Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Keywords: cell adhesion, hyperelasticity, polyurethane, shape memory, tissue regeneration
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Eastman Dental Institute > Biomaterials and Tissue Eng
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Eastman Dental Institute
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10148609
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