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Portable Three-Dimensional imaging to monitor small volume enhancement in face, vulva and hand: a comparative study

Almadori, Aurora; Speiser, Sophie; Ashby, Imogen; Larcher, René; Bishop, David; Mosahebi, Afshin; Butler, Peter EM; (2022) Portable Three-Dimensional imaging to monitor small volume enhancement in face, vulva and hand: a comparative study. Journal of Plastic, Reconstructive & Aesthetic Surgery 10.1016/j.bjps.2022.04.042. (In press). Green open access

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Abstract

Multiple handheld 3-dimentional systems are available on the market but data regarding their use in detecting small volumes are limited. The aim of this study was to compare different portable 3D technologies in detecting small volumetric enhancement on a mannequin model and a series of patients. Five portable 3D systems (Artec Eva, Crisalix, Go!Scan, LifeViz Mini, and Vectra H1) were tested in a controlled environment with standardised volumes and in a clinical setting with patients undergoing small volume fat grafting to face, vulva and hand. Accuracy was assessed with absolute and relative technical error measurement (TEM and rTEM); precision with intra- and inter-observer reliability (rp and ICC), and usability in clinical practice with the following parameters: portability, suitability of use in operating theatre/clinic, ease of use of hardware and software, speed of capture, image quality, patient comfort, and cost. All tested devices presented overall good accuracy in detecting small volumetric changes ranging from 0.5 to 4 cc. Structured-light laser scanners (Artec Eva and Go!Scan) showed high accuracy but their use in clinical practice was limited by longer capture time, multiple wiring, and complex software for analysis. Crisalix was considered the most user-friendly, less bothering for patients, and truly portable but its use was limited to the face because the software does not include vulva and hand. 3D technologies exploiting the principle of passive stereophotogrammetry such as LifeViz Mini and Vectra H1 were the most versatile for assessing accurately multiple body areas, representing overall the best long-term value-for-money. 3D portable technology is a non-invasive, accurate, and reproducible method to assess the volumetric outcome after facial, vulval and hand injectables. The choice of the 3D system should be based on the clinical need and resources available.

Type: Article
Title: Portable Three-Dimensional imaging to monitor small volume enhancement in face, vulva and hand: a comparative study
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1016/j.bjps.2022.04.042
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bjps.2022.04.042
Language: English
Additional information: © 2022 Published by Elsevier Ltd. This is an open access article under the CC BY 4.0 license Attribution 4.0 International (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/)
Keywords: Volumetric outcome, Outcome measure, Fat graft, dermal filler, injectable, survival, 3D imaging, 3D technology, 3D laser scan, structured lights, tereophotogrammetry
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10148133
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