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Developmental coordination disorder (dyspraxia): what helps, what hinders in the school years for later achievement and wellbeing?

Bidwell, Veronica; (2022) Developmental coordination disorder (dyspraxia): what helps, what hinders in the school years for later achievement and wellbeing? Doctoral thesis (D.Ed.Psy), UCL (University College London). Green open access

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Abstract

Background. Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) is a condition impacting physical coordination and organisation of movement. Poor central executive skills (planning, organising and prioritising) are also evident. The rate of anxiety and depression amongst pupils, young adults and adults experiencing DCD is greater than would be expected. / Aims. 1. To evaluate the evidence for social, emotional and educational difficulties associated with DCD during the school years. 2. To relate pupil experiences during key stages 4 and 5 with their wellbeing as young adults and with academic attainments. Literature review. Twenty three research papers were identified which addressed (i) the evidence which associates the physical manifestations of DCD with additional social, emotional, educational and cognitive difficulties, (ii) the theoretical perspectives put forward to account for these associated difficulties and (iii) interventions reported with consideration of their impact and useability. / Sample. The study participants were 26 young adults (aged 20 to 36) previously identified through the author’s private practice as experiencing possible dyspraxia together with their parents. / Methods. The study addressed two key questions and employed a mixed method exploratory design combining cross-sectional and predictive information (due to the availability of historical data) The participants completed online questionnaires. The young adult questionnaire covered school experiences, educational attainment, their current situation and reflections on their school experience. The parent questionnaire covered similar topics. / Results. A strong link was found between the young adults’ current wellbeing and their perceptions of the level of recognition and understanding of DCD shown by their teachers in school. Academic achievement was positively correlated with verbal ability; qualitative data indicates the benefit of parental support. / Conclusions. The identification of DCD amongst the school aged population is essential if later negative consequences are to be avoided. Teachers need input which will enable them to 1) recognise behaviours indicative of DCD and 2) provide a supportive learning and social environment. The evidence suggests that this would enable such pupils to thrive emotionally, achieve academically and minimise later mental health issues.

Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Qualification: D.Ed.Psy
Title: Developmental coordination disorder (dyspraxia): what helps, what hinders in the school years for later achievement and wellbeing?
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © The Author 2022. Original content in this thesis is licensed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International (CC BY-NC 4.0) Licence (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/). Any third-party copyright material present remains the property of its respective owner(s) and is licensed under its existing terms. Access may initially be restricted at the author’s request.
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10147670
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