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Progression through emergency and temporary shelter, transitional housing and permanent housing: A longitudinal case study from the 2018 Lombok earthquake, Indonesia

Lines, R; Faure Walker, JP; Yore, R; (2022) Progression through emergency and temporary shelter, transitional housing and permanent housing: A longitudinal case study from the 2018 Lombok earthquake, Indonesia. International Journal of Disaster Risk Reduction , 75 , Article 102959. 10.1016/j.ijdrr.2022.102959. Green open access

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Abstract

Increasing quality while reducing the time and costs of progressing disaster-affected populations from emergency shelter to permanent housing is key for improving post-disaster resilience. However, targets set around quality and time are often overly optimistic; the process is complex and factors affecting the progression of shelter and housing through the initial weeks and months following a disaster are diverse and not well documented. To identify which contributors are key to recovery efforts and at what stages in the process they can help or hinder, we need to study post-disaster environments over time. This longitudinal study of the shelter and housing evolution over the first eight months following the August 2018 Lombok earthquake helps to provide some insight. We argue that unrealistic expectations over timelines and standards were set. We consider the humanitarian response through aid and grants, the role of individual actors, and wealth and location of those affected. Hampering overall recovery efforts were a lack of transitional housing policy, an overly complex grant process for permanent housing construction, and a failure to declare a national disaster in a politicised environment. Conversely, shelter vulnerability reduction (people moving into more secure shelter then housing) at household level was marginally affected by wealth, proximity to a regency centre, being in an urban location or receiving additional shelter aid in the first few months, but less influential four months following the disaster. Most households self-recovered, with those recovering fastest being the most proactive and adaptable, who were supported by an effective village leader.

Type: Article
Title: Progression through emergency and temporary shelter, transitional housing and permanent housing: A longitudinal case study from the 2018 Lombok earthquake, Indonesia
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1016/j.ijdrr.2022.102959
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijdrr.2022.102959
Language: English
Additional information: © 2022 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd. This is an open access article under the CC BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
Keywords: Disaster management, Disaster risk reduction, Lombok earthquake, Emergency shelter, Transitional shelter, Temporary housing, Build back better, Government housing grants
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Maths and Physical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Maths and Physical Sciences > Inst for Risk and Disaster Reduction
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS
UCL
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10147363
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