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Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for adolescents and adults with inborn errors of immunity, an EBMT IEWP study

Albert, Michael H; Sirait, Tiarlan; Eikema, Dirk-Jan; Bakunina, Katerina; Wehr, Claudia; Suarez, Felipe; Fox, María Laura; ... Morris, Emma C; + view all (2022) Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for adolescents and adults with inborn errors of immunity, an EBMT IEWP study. Blood 10.1182/blood.2022015506. (In press).

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Abstract

Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is the gold standard curative therapy for infants and children with many inborn errors of immunity (IEI), but adolescents and adults with IEI are rarely referred for transplant. Lack of published HSCT outcome data outside small, single-center studies and perceived high risk of transplant related mortality have delayed the adoption of HSCT for IEI patients presenting or developing significant organ damage later in life. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is the gold standard curative therapy for infants and children with many inborn errors of immunity (IEI), but adolescents and adults with IEI are rarely referred for transplant. Lack of published HSCT outcome data outside small, single-center studies and perceived high risk of transplant related mortality have delayed the adoption of HSCT for IEI patients presenting or developing significant organ damage later in life. This large retrospective, multicenter HSCT outcome study reports on 329 IEI patients (age range 15-62.5 years at HSCT). Patients underwent first HSCT between 2000 and 2019. Primary endpoints were overall survival (OS) and event-free survival (EFS). We also evaluated the influence of IEI-subgroup and IEI-specific risk factors at HSCT, including infections, bronchiectasis, colitis, malignancy, inflammatory lung disease, splenectomy, hepatic dysfunction and systemic immunosuppression. At a median follow-up of 44.3 months, the estimated OS at 1 and 5 years post-HSCT for all patients was 78% and 71% and EFS was 65% and 62%, respectively, with low rates of severe acute (8%) or extensive chronic (7%) GVHD. On univariate analysis, OS and EFS were inferior in patients with primary antibody deficiency, bronchiectasis, prior splenectomy, hepatic comorbidity, and with higher HCT-CI scores. On multivariable analysis EFS was inferior in those with a higher number of IEI-associated complications. Neither age nor donor had a significant effect on OS or EFS. We have identified age-independent risk factors for adverse outcome, providing much needed evidence to identify which patients are most likely to benefit from HSCT. At a median follow-up of 44.3 months, the estimated OS at 1 and 5 years post-HSCT for all patients was 78% and 71% and EFS was 65% and 62%, respectively, with low rates of severe acute (8%) or extensive chronic (7%) GVHD. On univariate analysis, OS and EFS were inferior in patients with primary antibody deficiency, bronchiectasis, prior splenectomy, hepatic comorbidity, and with higher HCT-CI scores. On multivariable analysis EFS was inferior in those with a higher number of IEI-associated complications. Neither age nor donor had a significant effect on OS or EFS. We have identified age-independent risk factors for adverse outcome, providing much needed evidence to identify which patients are most likely to benefit from HSCT.

Type: Article
Title: Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for adolescents and adults with inborn errors of immunity, an EBMT IEWP study
Location: United States
DOI: 10.1182/blood.2022015506
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1182/blood.2022015506
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher's terms and conditions.
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Infection and Immunity
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10146813
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