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Assessing initial MRI reports for suspected CJD patients

Jesuthasan, Aaron; Sequeira, Danielle; Hyare, Harpreet; Odd, Hans; Rudge, Peter; Mok, Tze How; Nihat, Akin; ... Mead, Simon; + view all (2022) Assessing initial MRI reports for suspected CJD patients. Journal of Neurology 10.1007/s00415-022-11087-x. (In press). Green open access

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: MRI is invaluable for the pre-mortem diagnosis of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD), demonstrating characteristic diffusion abnormalities. Previous work showed these changes were often not reported (low sensitivity), leading to eventual diagnosis at a more advanced state. Here, we reviewed the situation a decade later, on the presumption of improved access and awareness over time. METHODS: We reviewed initial MRI scans of 102 consecutive suspected sCJD patients recruited to the National Prion Monitoring Cohort study between 2015 and 2019, assessing for characteristic signal changes in the striatum, thalamus and cortical ribbon. We compared our findings to formal reports from referring centres. Requesting indications were studied to assess if they were suggestive of CJD. Patients were examined and their MRC Prion Disease Rating Scale scores recorded. RESULTS: We identified characteristic MRI abnormalities in 101 cases (99% sensitivity), whilst referring centres reported changes in 70 cases (69% sensitivity), which was a significant improvement in reporting sensitivity from 2012. Reporting sensitivity was associated with signal change in the cerebral cortex, and with the number of regions involved, but not significantly affected by clinical information on request forms, or referring centres being regional neuroscience/non-neuroscience centres. Similar to a previous study, patients with missed abnormalities on initial reporting possessed lower MRC Scale scores when referred to the NPC than those correctly identified. CONCLUSIONS: Whilst local MRI reporting of sCJD has improved with time, characteristic abnormalities remain significantly under detected on initial scans. Sensitivity is better when the cerebral cortex and multiple regions are involved. We re-emphasize the utility of MRI and encourage further efforts to improve awareness and sensitivity in the assessment of patients with rapidly progressive dementia.

Type: Article
Title: Assessing initial MRI reports for suspected CJD patients
Location: Germany
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1007/s00415-022-11087-x
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00415-022-11087-x
Language: English
Additional information: This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
Keywords: CJD, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, MRI, Prion
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Institute of Prion Diseases > MRC Prion Unit at UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Institute of Prion Diseases
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10146565
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