UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Bacteria in the cavity-restoration interface after varying periods of clinical service – SEM description of distribution and 16S rRNA gene sequence identification of isolates

Arora, Roopinder; Mordan, Nicola; Spratt, David; Ng, Yuan; Gulabivala, Kishor; (2022) Bacteria in the cavity-restoration interface after varying periods of clinical service – SEM description of distribution and 16S rRNA gene sequence identification of isolates. Clinical Oral Investigations , 26 pp. 5029-5044. 10.1007/s00784-022-04473-2. Green open access

[thumbnail of Ng_Arora2022_Article_BacteriaInTheCavity-restoratio.pdf]
Preview
Text
Ng_Arora2022_Article_BacteriaInTheCavity-restoratio.pdf

Download (7MB) | Preview

Abstract

Objectives To use extracted human teeth with amalgam (n = 26) or GIC (n = 3) restorations in service up to 20 years to evaluate microbiota at the cavity/restoration interface by SEM or culture. Materials and methods Extracted teeth with intracoronal restorations (n = 20) of known history (2–20 years) were fixed, split, and prepared for SEM to ascertain the pattern and structure of bacterial aggregates on cavity and restoration surfaces. Another 9 teeth were anaerobically decontaminated, split and sampled (cavity/restorations), and cultured (anaerobically, aerobically); recovered isolates were identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Results SEM showed rods, cocci, and filaments in 11/20 teeth (55%) on cavity and corresponding restoration surfaces; 4/20 (20%) on neither surface; 1/20 (5%) on just cavity; and 4/20 (20%) on just restoration. Microbial growth extended from marginal openings into the deeper interfacial microspace to varying extents but was not always evident. Restoration size or age did not predict bacterial presence. Bacteria-free surfaces (cavity/amalgam) showed possible calcification. Cultivation yielded 160 isolates, mainly Gram-positive (86%) and facultative (81%); and morphotypes of rods (43%), cocci (36%), and cocco-bacilli (18%) belonging to Actinobacteria (45%) and Firmicutes (50%). The most frequent genera were Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, Actinomyces, and Lactobacillus. Biofilms on cavity and restoration appeared independent of each other. Conclusions Cavity and amalgam surfaces were independently colonised and some not. The penetration of microbiota into marginal gaps varied; resembled root caries and was dominated by Gram-positive species. Clinical relevance Marginal gaps around restorations are unavoidable but are not always colonised by bacteria after long-term clinical service. Calcification of biofilms in the restorative interface may prevent further colonisation. The viable microbiota in the restorative interface resembled root caries and may be subject to ecological fluxes of activity and arrest and therefore preventative management.

Type: Article
Title: Bacteria in the cavity-restoration interface after varying periods of clinical service – SEM description of distribution and 16S rRNA gene sequence identification of isolates
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1007/s00784-022-04473-2
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00784-022-04473-2
Language: English
Additional information: This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
Keywords: Bacteria, Microleakage, Cavity-amalgam interface, SEM, Bacterial identification
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Eastman Dental Institute > Restorative Dental Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Eastman Dental Institute
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10145539
Downloads since deposit
17Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item