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The selective disruption of presynaptic JNK2/STX1a interaction reduces NMDA receptor-dependent glutamate release

Marcelli, Serena; Iannuzzi, Filomena; Ficulle, Elena; Mango, Dalila; Pieraccini, Stefano; Pellegrino, Sara; Corbo, Massimo; ... Feligioni, Marco; + view all (2019) The selective disruption of presynaptic JNK2/STX1a interaction reduces NMDA receptor-dependent glutamate release. Scientific Reports , 9 , Article 7146. 10.1038/s41598-019-43709-2. Green open access

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Abstract

The neuronal loss caused by excessive glutamate release, or ‘excitotoxicity’, leads to several pathological conditions, including cerebral ischemia, epilepsy, and neurodegenerative diseases. Over-stimulation of presynaptic N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors is known to trigger and support glutamate spillover, while postsynaptic NMDA receptors are responsible for the subsequent apoptotic cascade. Almost all molecules developed so far are unable to selectively block presynaptic or postsynaptic NMDA receptors, therefore a deeper knowledge about intracellular NMDA pathways is required to design more specific inhibitors. Our previous work showed that presynaptic c-Jun N-terminal kinase 2 (JNK2) specifically regulates NMDA-evoked glutamate release and here we demonstrate that an interaction between Syntaxin-1a and JNK2 is fundamental to this mechanism. Based on this evidence, a new cell permeable peptide (CPP), “JGRi1”, has been developed to disrupt the JNK2/STX1a interaction to indirectly, but specifically, inhibit presynaptic NMDA receptor signaling. JGRi1 reduces the NMDA-evoked release of glutamate both in in-vitro and ex-vivo experiments while also being able to widely diffuse throughout brain tissue via intraperitoneal administration. In conclusion, the JNK2/STX1 interaction is involved in presynaptic NMDA-evoked glutamate release and the novel CPP, JGRi1, acts as a pharmacological tool that promotes neuroprotection.

Type: Article
Title: The selective disruption of presynaptic JNK2/STX1a interaction reduces NMDA receptor-dependent glutamate release
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1038/s41598-019-43709-2
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-43709-2
Language: English
Additional information: © The Author(s) 2019. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. Te images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
Keywords: Science & Technology, Multidisciplinary Sciences, Science & Technology - Other Topics, CELL-PENETRATING PEPTIDES, SNARE-COMPLEX, CRYSTAL-STRUCTURE, SYNTAXIN 1, EXCITOTOXICITY, DOMAIN, PHOSPHORYLATION, INHIBITOR, RESPONSES, BINDING
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > UK Dementia Research Institute
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10144732
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