UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Obesity in women living with HIV aged 45-60 in England: An analysis of the PRIME study

Ashraf, Asma N; Okhai, Hajra; Sabin, Caroline A; Sherr, Lorraine; Haag, Katharina; Dhairyawan, Rageshri; Gilson, Richard; ... Tariq, Shema; + view all (2022) Obesity in women living with HIV aged 45-60 in England: An analysis of the PRIME study. HIV Medicine 10.1111/hiv.13242. (In press). Green open access

[thumbnail of Burns_Obesity in women living with HIV aged 45 60 in England  An analysis of the PRIME study.pdf]
Preview
Text
Burns_Obesity in women living with HIV aged 45 60 in England An analysis of the PRIME study.pdf - Published Version

Download (158kB) | Preview

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Menopause contributes to weight gain in women. We explored factors associated with obesity in women with HIV aged 45-60 years. METHODS: The present study is an analysis of cross-sectional questionnaire and clinic data from the Positive Transitions Through the Menopause (PRIME) Study. We categorized body mass index (BMI) as normal/underweight (< 25 kg/m2 ), overweight (25-29.9 kg/m2 ) and obese (> 30 kg/m2 ). We used logistic regression to explore demographic, social, lifestyle and clinical factors associated with BMI. RESULTS: We included 396 women in this analysis. Median age was 49 years [interquartile range (IQR): 47-52]. Most (83.6%) were not UK-born; the majority (69.4%) were black African (BA). Median (IQR) BMI was 28.6 (24.6-32.6) kg/m2 ; and 110 (27.8%), 127 (32.1%) and 159 (40.1%) of the women were normal/underweight, overweight and obese, respectively. Median (IQR) BMI did not differ in pre-, peri- and post-menopausal women (p = 0.90). In univariable analysis, being non-UK-born was associated with BMI > 30 kg/m2 [odds ratio (OR) = 1.94, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.07-3.53]. Compared with BA women, women of other black ethnicities were more likely to be obese (OR = 2.37, 95% CI: 1.02-5.50) whereas white British women were less likely to be obese (OR = 0.34, 95% CI: 0.17-0.68). Current smoking and increasing number of comorbid conditions were associated with increased BMI. We found no association between obesity and socioeconomic status. On multivariable analysis, only ethnicity remained associated with obesity (compared with BA: white British, OR = 0.34, 95% CI: 0.17-0.68; other black, OR = 2.50, 95% CI: 1.07-5.82). CONCLUSIONS: Nearly two-fifths of women had BMI > 30 kg/m2 . Obesity was associated with black ethnicities but not with menopausal status. The combination of obesity and HIV may place women at increased risk of co-morbidities, requiring tailored and culturally appropriate interventions.

Type: Article
Title: Obesity in women living with HIV aged 45-60 in England: An analysis of the PRIME study
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1111/hiv.13242
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1111/hiv.13242
Language: English
Additional information: This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third-party material in this article are included in the Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Keywords: HIV, menopause, obesity, women
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute for Global Health > Infection and Population Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute for Global Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10144108
Downloads since deposit
0Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item