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Associations of physical activity, sedentary behaviour, and physical fitness with common mental health symptoms in the population

Kandola, Aaron Amarjit; (2022) Associations of physical activity, sedentary behaviour, and physical fitness with common mental health symptoms in the population. Doctoral thesis (Ph.D), UCL (University College London). Green open access

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Abstract

Objectives: 1) Develop a framework of the biological and psychosocial pathways through which physical activity may influence depressive symptoms. 2) Examine the association of device-measured physical activity and sedentary behaviour with common mental health disorder (CMD; depression and anxiety) symptoms across the lifespan. 3) Investigate the associations of cardiorespiratory and muscular fitness with CMDs in the population. / Methods: Objective 1: A narrative review on potential biological and psychosocial mechanisms underpinning the association between physical activity and depressive symptoms. Objective 2: Three prospective cohort studies of associations between accelerometer-based sedentary behaviour and physical activity with CMD symptoms in adolescents and adults. Objective 3: A systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective studies of associations between cardiorespiratory fitness and CMD symptoms and a prospective cohort study on associations of cardiorespiratory and muscular fitness with CMD symptom scales. / Results: Objective 1: The conceptual framework included neuroplasticity, oxidative stress, inflammation, endocrine responses, self-esteem, and social support as possible mediators underlying the association between physical activity and depressive symptoms. Objective 2: Sedentary behaviour was positively associated with CMD symptoms. An hour of light activity was associated with 8-16% lower CMD scores in adolescents but 1% lower depressive scores and 4% higher anxiety in adults. An hour of moderate-vigorous activity was associated with 6-12% lower CMD scores in adults but there was no association in adolescents. Objective 3: The meta-analysis showed that low cardiorespiratory fitness was associated with 47% higher risk of CMD incidence than high cardiorespiratory fitness. The prospective cohort study showed that low cardiorespiratory and muscular fitness were associated with 1.48 and 1.38 higher odds of CMD incidence, respectively compared to high fitness. / Conclusions: High sedentary behaviour and low cardiorespiratory or muscular fitness are CMD risk factors, but the optimal intensity for replacing sedentary behaviour was unclear and could vary by age.

Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Qualification: Ph.D
Title: Associations of physical activity, sedentary behaviour, and physical fitness with common mental health symptoms in the population
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © The Author 2022. Original content in this thesis is licensed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International (CC BY-NC 4.0) Licence (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/). Any third-party copyright material present remains the property of its respective owner(s) and is licensed under its existing terms. Access may initially be restricted at the author’s request.
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Division of Psychiatry
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10143436
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