UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Manipulating Interface Design Features Affects Children's Stop-And-Think Behaviours in a Counterintuitive-Problem Game

Gauthier, Andrea; Porayska-Pomsta, Kaska; Dumontheil, Iroise; Mayer, Sveta; Mareschal, Denis; (2022) Manipulating Interface Design Features Affects Children's Stop-And-Think Behaviours in a Counterintuitive-Problem Game. ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction , 29 (2) , Article 12. 10.1145/3485168. Green open access

[thumbnail of TOCHI_HCI-S&T_manuscript_20210905_unformatted.pdf]
Preview
PDF
TOCHI_HCI-S&T_manuscript_20210905_unformatted.pdf - Accepted Version

Download (6MB) | Preview

Abstract

The human–computer interaction (HCI) design of educational technologies influences cognitive behaviour, so it is imperative to assess how different HCI strategies support intended behaviour. We developed a neuroscience-inspired game that trains children's use of “stopping-and-thinking” (S&T)—an inhibitory control-related behaviour—in the context of counterintuitive science problems. We tested the efficacy of four HCI features in supporting S&T: (1) a readiness mechanic, (2) motion cues, (3) colour cues, and (4) rewards/penalties. In a randomised eye-tracking trial with 45 7-to-8-year-olds, we found that the readiness mechanic increased S&T duration, that motion and colour cues proved equally effective at promoting S&T, that combining symbolic colour with the readiness mechanic may have a cumulative effect, and that rewards/penalties may have distracted children from S&T. Additionally, S&T duration was related to in-game performance. Our results underscore the importance of interdisciplinary approaches to educational technology research that actively investigates how HCI impacts intended learning behaviours.

Type: Article
Title: Manipulating Interface Design Features Affects Children's Stop-And-Think Behaviours in a Counterintuitive-Problem Game
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1145/3485168
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1145/3485168
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions. // This research was funded in part by the Wellcome Trust [105466/Z/14/Z] and the the Education Endowment Foundation. For the purpose of open access, the author has applied a CC BY public copyright licence to any Author Accepted Manuscript version arising from this submission.
Keywords: Human-computer interaction design, visual cues, inhibitory control, primary education, game-based learning
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education > UCL Institute of Education
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education > UCL Institute of Education > IOE - Culture, Communication and Media
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education
UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education > UCL Institute of Education > IOE - Learning and Leadership
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10143343
Downloads since deposit
16Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item